Hurricane Irma: Webcams show the storm moving up Florida’s west …

Hurricane Irma is making its way up the Florida coast, and is expected to make landfall between Marco Island and Everglades City on Sunday afternoon. Live web cams and traffic cams are a good way to track the storm as it progresses.

The southernmost point cam made for good internet fodder yesterday as people took selfies with Irma (we hope they are all safe now). The camera at Mallory Square in Key West still appears to be live.

These cameras are falling like dominoes as the storm moves north. All the existing cameras on Marco Island (south of Naples) seem to be out already. (In case they come back online, the link is here). The camera in Everglades City is also out. Storm chaser, Jeff Piotrowski, has been streaming live on Periscope. He was on Marco Island Sunday morning, and moved to the mainland in Collier County before Irma’s eyewall made landfall.

SevereStudios Storm Chasers are streaming live on Facebook from Marco Island. As of 2:30 pm ET, winds were measured at 120 mph on the island. At 3:35 pm ET Sunday, Irma officially made landfall on Marco Island.

There is one camera in Naples provided by HurricaneTrack.com. It shows an unidentified street corner.

Streaming Media Platform

Sanibel Island, which lies just off the coast of Fort Myers, has several web cams available. One traffic cam shows the Sanibel Causeway, the three-mile bridge that connects the island to the mainland. And the Island Inn, a beachfront resort has a camera set up to watch the ocean. It currently shows the storm has ominously lowered water levels significantly.

Sanibel Causeway Hurricane Irma
Taken around 12:30pm local ET. (City of Sanibel)

Further north, the University of Tampa has a camera going.

In nearby Clearwater, a barrier island off the coast of Tampa, a camera facing a marina is still live.

Across the state, many of the cameras in Miami are down. The Windjammer Resort, located north of Fort Lauderdale, still has a working camera.

Near Palm Beach, Jupiter Inlet has a camera that takes photos about once an hour.

jupiter inlet
Taken at Sep 10, 2017 at 12:51 PM ET. (Jupiter Inlet District)

Everglades National Park has a camera at Anhinga Trail that takes a photo and short video clip about once an hour. It’s easy to see the rapidly worsening conditions in the most recent photos.

everglades cam
Taken at Sep 10, 2017 at 11:31 AM. (National Park Service)

Read next: Hurricane Irma has taken a turn toward the most catastrophically vulnerable big city in America

Read next: There are whitecaps in the streets of downtown Miami

Article source: https://qz.com/1073741/hurricane-irma-webcams-show-the-storm-moving-up-floridas-west-coast/

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Hurricane Irma: Folks around the world will be watching Jupiter

People from mountainous Switzerland and faraway New Zealand are watching. And landlocked Hungary. The three cold countries in Scandinavia are regular digital visitors. Clicks come from Yemen, Vietnam, Iceland, Israel, Iran, Cuba, Australia’s Outback and Russia.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/local/hurricane-irma-folks-around-the-world-will-watching-jupiter/IdKqJtv2QrRbQAeHRNnbeL/

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Tornado warning for WPB, Boynton and Delray until 4:15 pm

Update 3:52 pm.: A tornado warning has been issued for parts of Palm  Beach County including West Palm Beach, Boynton Beach and Delray Beach until 4:15 p.m.

 

UPDATE, 2:40 p.m.: The National Weather Service has issued a tornado warning for central Palm Beach County, including Wellington, Royal Palm Beach and Loxahatchee Groves, until 3 p.m.

The storm is moving northwest at 80 mph.

UPDATE, 2:27 p.m.: The National Weather Service has issued a tornado warning for southeastern Palm Beach County, including Boca Raton, Boynton Beach and Delray Beach, until 2:45 p.m.

The storm is moving northwest at 90 mph.

UPDATE, 1:50 p.m.: The National Weather Service has issued a tornado warning for eastern Broward County and parts of southeastern Palm Beach County, effective until 2:15 p.m.

A severe thunderstorm capable of producing a tornado was located 8 miles east of Surfside and moving northwest at 90 mph.

Boca Raton and other cities were included in this warning.

Update 3:45 a.m.: The National Weather Service has issued a tornado warning for southern Palm Beach County through 4:15 a.m.

Affected communities include Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Boynton Beach.

NWS radar detected a band of powerful thunderstorms moving northwest at 30 mph.

Update 3 a.m.: Hurricane Irma, a Category 4 storm still packing 130 mph winds, inched closer to Key West, now just 65 miles southeast.

In addition, the National Hurricane Center showed that the National Ocean Service’s station on Pulaski Shoals Light — near the Dry Tortugas — experienced a sustained wind of 62 mph and a gust to 76 mph.

Update 2 a.m.:  Hurricane Irma’s top winds have increased to 130 mph, making it a Category 4 storm as it moves within 70 miles of Key West.

“On the forecast track, the center of Irma is expected to cross the Lower Florida Keys during the next several hours, and then move near or along the west coast of Florida this afternoon through Monday morning,” a 2 a.m. National Hurricane Center advisory said.  “Irma should then move inland over the Florida panhandle and southwestern Georgia Monday afternoon.”

The storm is still moving northwest at 6 mph, but is expected to pick up speed in coming hours, forecasters said. Despite earlier projections it might remain a Category 3 storm,  it has gained strength again as it nears Florida.

“Irma is forecast to restrengthen a little more while it moves through the Straits of Florida and remain a powerful hurricane as it approaches the Florida Keys and the west coast of Florida,” the advisory said.

The storm’s reach has widened, with tropical storm-force winds of 39 mph or more now extending 205 miles.

Update 1 a.m.:  Hurricane Irma is “slowly tracking toward the western Florida Keys,” a National Hurricane Center update says, with top wind speeds of 120 mph.

The Category 3 storm is moving about 6 mph northwest, about 80 miles to the  southeast  of Key West. Sluggish progress  leaves the west coast and Panhandle of Florida wondering where it will make landfall, while southeast Florida sweats out thunderstorms and tornado threats.  A slower pace also means more time to dump a potential 10 trillion gallons of rain on the state.  Parts of Palm Beach County could see more than 10 inches of rain.

More than 200,000 people in southeast Florida have lost power, including more than 28,000 in Palm Beach County.

 

 

Hurricane Irma has advanced within 80 miles of Key West, producing gusts up 68 mph there, but a westward drift has removed Jupiter inlet and areas south of it from a storm surge warning.

The storm remain a Category 3 hurricane, moving slowly northwest at 6 mph with top winds of 120 mph in a midnight update from the National Hurricane Center.

 

Business owners in Palm Beach County had a message for Hurricane Irma. (Greg Lovett/Palm Beach Post)

A wobble one way or the other in the next few hours has huge consequences for Florida’s west coast and potentially the Panhandle, and  the storm’s bands continue to send thunderstorms, high winds, rain and the threat of tornadoes to southeast Florida.

Advancing over warm open water opens the possibility Irma will strengthen, but the latest projections from the National Hurricane Center suggest it will remain a Category 3 storm in the next 24 hours. That makes it still a very dangerous storm, but the risks to Palm Beach County and the Treasure appear to be easing. West Palm Beach still has a 59 percent of  receiving tropical storm-force winds of 39 mph or more in the next 12 hours, but the risk of sustained hurricane winds, 74 mph or more, is down to about 1 percent.

 

 

 

 



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Irma’s not over: Tropical storm warning affects Jupiter Inlet south

Update 11 p.m.: It’s not over for Palm Beach County.  Hurricane Irma has pushed within 50 miles southeast of Tampa with Category 2  hurricane winds up to 100 mph, but  a tropical storm warning is in effect for Jupiter Inlet southward around the Florida peninsula to Bonita Beach.

The storm is moving north at 14 mph, though its track is expected to bend to the northwest in coming hours.

Tropical-storm-force winds, meaning 39 mph or more, extend outward up to 415 miles. That is double the reach the  storm had at earlier stages.

Gusts of more than 7o mph have been reported at Palm Beach International Airport.

Update 10 p.m.: As Hurricane Irma climbs up the state’s western and central spine,  its long arms have raked the east side longer than many expected.

The Juno Beach pier was blasted with an 83 mph gust, the National Weather Service noted in a 10 p.m. update.

A storage shed falls apart at a Jupiter Beach Resort as the outer bands of hurricane Irma hit Jupiter Sunday. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

That was stronger than a 78 mph gust in Tampa Bay, closer to the storm’s approaching center.

“Winds are still sustained tropical storm force with winds gusting 50-70 mph,” the NWS office in Miami tweeted earlier. “These wind gust can bring down trees, power lines.”

Sustained winds are expected to subside below 4o mph by 5 a.m. Monday in Palm Beach County, but for many, the storm is far from over.

Irma’s center moved 50 miles northeast of Fort Myers, maintaining top winds of 105 mph and moving north at 14 mph.

Update 9 p.m.:  Hurricane Irma has pushed 35 miles northeast of Fort Myers with top sustained winds at 105 mph, maintaining a 14 mph pace on a northerly track.

It is expected to take a northwesterly turn overnight, reaching the Georgia border by Monday afternoon. Before then, it steams through the I-4 corridor with population centers Tampa and Orlando and into the Panhandle.

Update 8 p.m.: Hurricane Irma’s top winds slowed slightly to 105 mph, or Category 2 strength, with its center about 15 miles northeast of Fort Myers. It is moving north at about 14 mph.

Strong winds continue to blow across the state including Palm Beach County. A storm surge warning remains in effect from the South Santee River southward to Jupiter Inlet.

 

A National Weather Service update about 6 p.m. cautioned gusts from 80 mph to 100 mph were possible in Palm Beach County through midnight, though sustained winds are expected to diminish over time and below 40 mph by 5 a.m. Monday.

Update 7 p..m.: Irma’s eyewall is “hammering Fort Myers,” a National Hurricane Center advisory says.

The storm’s center is about 15 miles east and north of Fort Myers, traveling north at 14 mph with top sustained winds at 110 mph.

Update 6 p.m.:   As Hurricane Irma’s  center plows into southwest Florida, Palm Beach County residents can expect periodic wind gusts from 80 mph to 100 mph,  continuing through about midnight, a National Weather Service update said.

Flagler Drive is raked by wind, rain and water from the Intracoastal Waterway in West Palm Beach Sunday afternoon, as winds from Hurricane Irma rake the county. (Lannis Waters / The Palm Beach Post)

But there’s some relief on the horizon:  Sustained winds are expected to subside below  tropical force, meaning below 39 mph, by 5 a.m. Monday, forecasters said.

“The worst of the winds are basically winding down,”  said NWS meteorologist Chris Fisher in Miami.  “But it’s still going to remain gusty through the evening and tomorrow morning, with a lot of power outages.  It’s probably not a good idea to venture out tonight.”

Irma’s center is about 25 miles southeast of Fort Myers. It is moving north at 14 mph, with top winds of 110 mph.

Update 5 p.m.: Hurricane Irma’s center moved past Naples with top sustained winds of 110 mph, but the storm’s winds may slow down if its stays on land, forecasters said.

“The eye just passed over Naples, ” a 5 p.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center said.  Interaction with land and  countervailing wind forces pushing against it “should cause
significant weakening, but Irma’s large and powerful circulation will likely maintain hurricane strength until Monday morning at the earliest,” the advisory said.

The  latest predictions show top sustained winds slowing  to 85 mph in 12 hours and 65 mph in 24 hours, which would make it still dangerous and damaging but no longer a hurricane.

Meanwhile, the threat of a storm surges still poses a big  danger for southwest Florida.

“The threat of catastrophic storm surge flooding is highest along the southwest coast of Florida, where 10 to 15 feet of inundation above ground level is expected,” officials said. “This is a life-threatening situation.”

Update 4 p.m.: The center of Hurricane Irma has moved inland about 10 miles southeast of Naples, the National Hurricane Center said.

It is moving north at 12 mph. Maximum sustained winds are 115 mph, making it a Category 3 storm.

Naples is the home of Florida Gov. Rick Scott.

“It’s clear that the entire country is standing with Florida as Hurricane Irma batters our state right now, ” Scott said in a statement. “I have heard from people all across the world that want to help and support Florida. It’s encouraging, and on behalf of all Floridians – we appreciate the support and constant collaboration.”

President Donald Trump approved a major disaster declaration, Scott’s office said. The declaration authorizes federal funding to flow directly to Floridians impacted by Hurricane Irma and reimburses local communities and the state government to aid in response and recovery from Hurricane Irma.

A wind gust of 142 mph was reported at the Naples airport. A flash flood warning has been issued for the area.

Irma’s center moves inland near Naples but its winds are felt statewide. A large flag at a Tequesta wharehouse on Old Dixie blows with the surging winds Sunday morning. (Melanie Bell / The Palm Beach Post)

 

Update 3:35 p.m.: Hurricane Irma has made landfall at Marco Island. the National Hurricane Center said.

A 130 mph wind gust was  reported by the Marco Island Police Department.

 

 

UPDATE, 2 p.m.: Hurricane Irma, located about 35 miles south of Naples, has top winds at 120 mph as it picks up speed heading toward southwest Florida.

The National Hurricane Center reported a sustained wind of 62 mph at Miami International Airport, with a 99 mph gust. An 81 mph gust was recorded at the NHC office in Miami.

The storm, now with Category 3 winds, is moving north at about 12 mph, with a turn to the north-northwest and an increase in speed expected to start later today and continue through Monday, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Forecasters expect Irma to continue weakening some but, with its massive wind field, will remain powerful while it traces the west coast of Florida.

Storm surge remains a major hazard with the storm along the west coast of Florida. The current forecast calls for water reaching 10-15 feet above ground from Cape Saple to Captiva if the peak surge happens at high tide.

Hurricane-force winds extend nearly 80 miles from the center, with tropical storm-force winds out to 220 miles from the eye.

 

Update 12:05 p.m.: Hurricane Irma is 65 miles south-southeast of Naples with maximum sustained windsd of 130 mph and moving north at 9 mph.

Update 11 a.m.:  Hurricane Irma is still a Category 4 storm with 130 mph winds moving north at 9 mph.

That means a second landfall is likely in Naples or Fort Myers today.

Irma’s center wobbled north over the past few hours as it embeds with in a broad mild-level gyre over the Gulf of Mexico.

Update: 10:06 a.m.: Irma’s eye is beginning to move away from the lower Florida Keys. A 93 mph gust was recently measured at Carysfort Reef Light near Key Largo. A National Ocean Service station in Key West just reported a sustained wind of 67 mph and a gust to 89 mph.

In West Palm Beach, winds are gusting to 62 mph at the Palm Beach International Airport with sustained winds of 43 mph.

Update 9:44 a.m.: The National Hurricane Center reports that Hurricane Irma made landfall at Cudjoe Key at 9:10 a.m.

A second Florida landfall is possible near Naples or Fort Myers.

Irma landfall is 1st Cat 4 in the Florida Keys since 1960’s Donna.

Update 9 a.m.: The lower Florida Keys is in the eye of Hurricane Irma, which is maintaining strength  as a 130 mph Category 4 hurricane.

A weather station in Key West just measured sustained winds of 71 mph with a gust to 91 mph.

Irma is moving north-northwest at 8 mph.

“Regardless of its peak winds at landfall, Irma poses an extremely serious storm-surge threat to the highly populated, surge-vulnerable stretch of coastline from Fort Myers to Tampa,” wrote Bob Henson, a meteorologist and blogger for Weather Underground. “The westward-trending track also raises concerns for the eastern Florida Panhandle, where a direct hurricane landfall would be possible if Irma stayed just off the state’s northwest coast.”

Update 8 a.m.: The center of Category 4 Hurricane Irma is about to make landfall in lower Florida Keys.

As of the 8 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center, the 130-mph hurricane was 20 miles east-southeast of Key west and about 110 miles south of Naples. It is moving north-northwest at 8 mph.

A wind gust of 91 mph was measured at the Key West National Weather Service office at 7:55 a.m.

An increase in forward speed is expected later today and should continue through Monday.

On the current track, Irma should move up the west coast of Florida today through tonight and inland over northern Florida and southwestern Georgia Monday afternoon.

Update 7 a.m.: The northern eyewall of Hurricane Irma has reached the lower Florida Keys.

The Category 4 storm with winds of 130 mph is moving northwest at 8 mph after making the long-awaited turn around the western edge of the Bermuda High.

The National Weather Service office in Key West is experiencing gusts to 89 mph.  Key West International Airport is measuring sustained winds of 50 mph with gusts to 70 mph.

Update 5 a.m.: Hurricane Irma was 40 miles south-southeast of Key West at 5 a.m. with sustained winds of 130 mph.

It is a Category 4 hurricane moving at a crawling 8 mph. Hurricane force-winds extend 80 miles from Irma’s center with tropical storm force winds extending an incredible 220 miles.

Irma is triggering tornado warnings in Palm Beach County, and a wind gust of 66 mph was recorded at Palm Beach International Airport with a recent squall.

While some intensification of Irma could occur over the next several hours, the National Hurricane Center said increasing wind shear should keep it to a minimum or even begin to weaken the storm as it encounters land.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

“The new intensity forecast is slightly lower than that of the previous advisory at those times, but it still calls for Irma to be a major hurricane at its closest approach to the Tampa Bay area,” forecasters wrote.

That is not good news to the storm vulnerable Gulf Coast.

 

“This is probably one of the worst tracks you can get for the west coast of Florida,” said Ken Clark, an expert meteorologist with AccuWeather. “It’s going to be bad.”

At its 11 p.m. advisory, the National Hurricane Center said Irma’s scrape of the Cuban coastline affected its intensity, dropping its winds to 120 mph temporarily.

Hurricane hunters reported a double eye wall, meaning a eye wall replacement cycle may have been underway – process that can weaken a storm.

Forecasters did not expect it to rebound so quickly, putting its max sustained winds at 125 mph before reaching land.

Although it’s likely Irma will move through or over the lower Keys this morning, the angle of approach makes it difficult to pinpoint exactly where Hurricane Irma will cross the Florida Gulf coast.

 

At Key West International Airport, a sustained wind speed of 43 mph with a gust to 73 mph was recorded this morning, while sustained winds of 66 mph were measured on Molasses Reef.

At Palm Beach International Airport, winds were gusting to 38 mph overnight with sustained winds measured at 29 mph.

Robert Molleda, warning coordination meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Miami, ,said squally storms in Irma’s outer bands could send 90-mph gusts into West Palm Beach that would topple trees, tear up patio awnings, down fences and wreck mobile homes.

“No part of South Florida is going to skate by this without significant impacts,” Molleda said Saturday. “We are going to have strong damaging wind gusts at the very least and that’s what we should be preparing for.”

Irma’s hurricane force-winds extended 70 miles from its center Saturday, with tropical storm-force winds reaching a whopping 195 miles from the core of the storm. That means Irma will easily touch most of Florida’s peninsula and into the eastern part of the Big Bend area.



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Watch Hurricane Irma rampage along the Florida coast via web cams

Hurricane Irma is making its way up the Florida coast, and is expected to make landfall between Marco Island and Everglades City on Sunday afternoon. Live web cams and traffic cams are a good way to track the storm as it progresses.

The southernmost point cam made for good internet fodder yesterday as people took selfies with Irma (we hope they are all safe now). The camera at Mallory Square in Key West still appears to be live.

These cameras are falling like dominoes as the storm moves north. All the existing cameras on Marco Island (south of Naples) seem to be out already. (In case they come back online, the link is here). The camera in Everglades City is also out. Storm chaser, Jeff Piotrowski, has been streaming live on Periscope. He was on Marco Island Sunday morning, and moved to the mainland in Collier County before Irma’s eyewall made landfall.

SevereStudios Storm Chasers are streaming live on Facebook from Marco Island. As of 2:30 pm ET, winds were measured at 120 mph on the island. At 3:35 pm ET Sunday, Irma officially made landfall on Marco Island.

There is one camera in Naples provided by HurricaneTrack.com. It shows an unidentified street corner.

Streaming Media Platform

Sanibel Island, which lies just off the coast of Fort Myers, has several web cams available. One traffic cam shows the Sanibel Causeway, the three-mile bridge that connects the island to the mainland. And the Island Inn, a beachfront resort has a camera set up to watch the ocean. It currently shows the storm has ominously lowered water levels significantly.

Sanibel Causeway Hurricane Irma
Taken around 12:30pm local ET. (City of Sanibel)

Further north, the University of Tampa has a camera going.

In nearby Clearwater, a barrier island off the coast of Tampa, a camera facing a marina is still live.

Across the state, many of the cameras in Miami are down. The Windjammer Resort, located north of Fort Lauderdale, still has a working camera.

Near Palm Beach, Jupiter Inlet has a camera that takes photos about once an hour.

jupiter inlet
Taken at Sep 10, 2017 at 12:51 PM ET. (Jupiter Inlet District)

Everglades National Park has a camera at Anhinga Trail that takes a photo and short video clip about once an hour. It’s easy to see the rapidly worsening conditions in the most recent photos.

everglades cam
Taken at Sep 10, 2017 at 11:31 AM. (National Park Service)

Read next: Hurricane Irma has taken a turn toward the most catastrophically vulnerable big city in America

Read next: There are whitecaps in the streets of downtown Miami

Article source: https://qz.com/1073741/hurricane-irma-webcams-show-the-storm-moving-up-floridas-west-coast/

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Tornado warning for southern Palm Beach County through 4:15 am

Update 3:45 a.m.: The National Weather Service has issued a tornado warning for southern Palm Beach County through 4:15 a.m.

Affected communities include Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Boynton Beach.

NWS radar detected a band of powerful thunderstorms moving northwest at 30 mph.

Update 3 a.m.: Hurricane Irma, a Category 4 storm still packing 130 mph winds, inched closer to Key West, now just 65 miles southeast.

In addition, the National Hurricane Center showed that the National Ocean Service’s station on Pulaski Shoals Light — near the Dry Tortugas — experienced a sustained wind of 62 mph and a gust to 76 mph.

Update 2 a.m.:  Hurricane Irma’s top winds have increased to 130 mph, making it a Category 4 storm as it moves within 70 miles of Key West.

“On the forecast track, the center of Irma is expected to cross the Lower Florida Keys during the next several hours, and then move near or along the west coast of Florida this afternoon through Monday morning,” a 2 a.m. National Hurricane Center advisory said.  “Irma should then move inland over the Florida panhandle and southwestern Georgia Monday afternoon.”

The storm is still moving northwest at 6 mph, but is expected to pick up speed in coming hours, forecasters said. Despite earlier projections it might remain a Category 3 storm,  it has gained strength again as it nears Florida.

“Irma is forecast to restrengthen a little more while it moves through the Straits of Florida and remain a powerful hurricane as it approaches the Florida Keys and the west coast of Florida,” the advisory said.

The storm’s reach has widened, with tropical storm-force winds of 39 mph or more now extending 205 miles.

Update 1 a.m.:  Hurricane Irma is “slowly tracking toward the western Florida Keys,” a National Hurricane Center update says, with top wind speeds of 120 mph.

The Category 3 storm is moving about 6 mph northwest, about 80 miles to the  southeast  of Key West. Sluggish progress  leaves the west coast and Panhandle of Florida wondering where it will make landfall, while southeast Florida sweats out thunderstorms and tornado threats.  A slower pace also means more time to dump a potential 10 trillion gallons of rain on the state.  Parts of Palm Beach County could see more than 10 inches of rain.

More than 200,000 people in southeast Florida have lost power, including more than 28,000 in Palm Beach County.

 

 

Hurricane Irma has advanced within 80 miles of Key West, producing gusts up 68 mph there, but a westward drift has removed Jupiter inlet and areas south of it from a storm surge warning.

The storm remain a Category 3 hurricane, moving slowly northwest at 6 mph with top winds of 120 mph in a midnight update from the National Hurricane Center.

 

Business owners in Palm Beach County had a message for Hurricane Irma. (Greg Lovett/Palm Beach Post)

A wobble one way or the other in the next few hours has huge consequences for Florida’s west coast and potentially the Panhandle, and  the storm’s bands continue to send thunderstorms, high winds, rain and the threat of tornadoes to southeast Florida.

Advancing over warm open water opens the possibility Irma will strengthen, but the latest projections from the National Hurricane Center suggest it will remain a Category 3 storm in the next 24 hours. That makes it still a very dangerous storm, but the risks to Palm Beach County and the Treasure appear to be easing. West Palm Beach still has a 59 percent of  receiving tropical storm-force winds of 39 mph or more in the next 12 hours, but the risk of sustained hurricane winds, 74 mph or more, is down to about 1 percent.

 

 

 

 



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Hurricane Irma: Jupiter icons buckled up for storm

  The Lazy Loggerhead Cafe, the 60-seat Florida eatery features linoleum floors, different colored chairs and tropical art work by locals for sale on the walls. The eatery is operated by Brian Wilson — NO, not THAT Brian Wilson — and his wife Jennifer.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/local/hurricane-irma-jupiter-icons-buckled-for-storm/452pEwLgy5I5xoWIZvjTlN/

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Is Jupiter, Florida Evacuating Because of Hurricane Irma?

Jupiter evacuations, Jupiter evacuation map, Hurricane Irma evacuationGetty

Jupiter during Hurricane Matthew in October 2016.

Jupiter and the rest of Palm Beach County is now covered under a hurricane warning because of Hurricane Irma and there has been a mandatory evacuation order, which began at 10:00 a.m. Friday. It is important to familiarize yourself with the evacuation maps and shelters in Jupiter.

In addition to the map below, you can click here to go to PBCGov.com/KnowUrZone to search by your address.

Jupiter evacuation zones, Palm Beach County evacuation, Hurricane Irma Evacuation Zones

Palm Beach CountyThe Palm Beach County Evacuation map.

Palm Beach County officials announced a mandatory evacuation for residents in residential structures in Zones A and B. Residents in Zone C are under a voluntary evacuation. Residents in the Glades area of Zone E are also under mandatory evacuation.

Zone A includes mobile homes and residents in low-lying areas. Zone B includes the barrier islands, plus areas north and south of the Jupiter Inlet. It also includes surge-vulnerable areas along the Intercoastal Waterway. Residents in Zone C who are not confident in the safety of their building or have experienced flooding in the past can evacuate.

“Zone C generally includes properties from the Intracoastal waterway west to US Highway 1 in South County and Central County, and areas in close proximity to the Loxahatchee River and the northern tip of the Lake Worth Lagoon,” officials note.

Classes were already cancelled in Palm Beach County for Thursday and Friday.

On Wednesday, Palm Beach County officials told WPTV that it is “highly recommended” that residents of the barrier islands evacuate now. However, there is no mandatory order.

The Jupiter War Cry notes that if you do plan on evacuating Palm Beach County, you can use the Florida Turnpike, I-95, US Highway 1, A1A and West Indiantown Road. Tolls on Florida highways have been suspended because of the storm.

Evacuation Zones Full County by Daniel S Levine on Scribd

“We strongly recommend that you begin doing so at this time,” County Administrator Verdenia Baker said. However, Baker added that you need to “evacuate miles, not hundreds of miles.” She also noted that it would be best for residents to find friends and family members to stay with, using shelters as a last resort.

Hurricane Irma track, Hurricane Irma path, Hurricane Irma forecast

NOAA/NHCHurricane Irma forecast from the NHC at 5 p.m. Friday.

Baker told WPTV that there are 15 shelters across the county. One shelter available in Jupiter is the Independence Middle School at 4001 Greenway Drive Jupiter 33458. The shelters will be opening at 10 a.m.

At 11:00 a.m. ET, the National Hurricane Center issued the first hurricane watches for South Florida, covering “Jupiter Inlet southward around the Florida peninsula to Bonita Beach,” the Florida Keys, Lake Okeechobee and Florida Bay. A Storm Surge Watch is also in effect for “Jupiter Inlet southward around the Florida peninsula to Bonita Beach” and the Florida Keys.

Storm Surge Watch, Hurricane Irma update

NOAA/NHCThe pink area is under a Storm Surge Watch.

A hurricane watch means that hurricane conditions – meaning maximum winds at or over 75 mph – are possible for the area. They are issued 48 hours in advance to give residents ample time to prepare.

To sign up for the ALERTPBC, Palm Beach County’s emergency notification system, click here.

Here is the seven-day forecast for Jupiter from the National Weather Service:

Friday: 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 91. Heat index values as high as 105. Northeast wind 8 to 15 mph, with gusts as high as 21 mph.
Friday Night: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 82. Windy, with a northeast wind 16 to 22 mph, with gusts as high as 31 mph. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.
Saturday: Tropical storm conditions possible, with hurricane conditions also possible. Showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 9am. High near 89. Heat index values as high as 103. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.
Saturday Night: Tropical storm conditions expected, with hurricane conditions possible. Showers and thunderstorms before 9pm, then showers and possibly a thunderstorm after 9pm. Low around 79. Chance of precipitation is 90%.
Sunday: Hurricane conditions possible. Showers and possibly a thunderstorm before 9am, then showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 9am. High near 88. Chance of precipitation is 90%.
Sunday Night: Hurricane conditions possible. Showers and thunderstorms likely before 9pm, then showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm after 9pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 76. Chance of precipitation is 70%.
Monday: Tropical storm conditions possible. Showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm before 9am, then a chance of showers and thunderstorms after 9am. Partly sunny, with a high near 90. Chance of precipitation is 70%.
Monday Night: A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly before 9pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 75. Windy, with a southwest wind 14 to 21 mph, with gusts as high as 29 mph.
Tuesday: A slight chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 90. Southwest wind 7 to 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Tuesday Night: A slight chance of showers, with thunderstorms also possible after 9pm. Partly cloudy, with a low around 77. Chance of precipitation is 20%.
Wednesday: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 89.
Wednesday Night: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 77.
Thursday: A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 88.

Florida residents can also find the most up-to-date information on Hurricane Irma at FloridaDisaster.org.

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Article source: http://heavy.com/news/2017/09/is-jupiter-evacuating-hurricane-irma-mandatory-flood-zones-map/

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Florida braces for Hurricane Irma: Watches, warnings now in effect

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Time is beginning to run out for you to put the finishing touches on your preparations for Hurricane Irma.

If an evacuation order comes down for your area, do you know where to go and what zone you’re inside? Check our interactive map. What about routes should you have to leave the area? We have a county-by-county guide.

List: Hurricane Irma evacuation notices, shelters in Tampa Bay

Track the tropics: Download the 10News app

Several hurricane warnings and watches now are in effect for Florida and the Tampa Bay region, meaning that within the next two days, hurricane-force winds in excess of 74 mph likely will be a reality.

As of the National Hurricane Center’s 5 a.m. Friday, Sept. 8, advisory, these areas are under hurricane alerts:

Warning: Jupiter Inlet southward around the Florida peninsula to Bonita Beach, as well as for the Florida Keys, Lake Okeechobee, and Florida Bay.

Watch: The east coast of Florida north of Jupiter Inlet to the Flagler/Volusia County line and for the west coast of Florida north of Bonita Beach to the Anclote River.

There also is a storm surge warning in effect for Jupiter Inlet southward around the Florida peninsula to Venice and the Florida Keys. A storm surge watch is for Sebastian Inlet to Ponce Inlet.

This is for the potential of life-threatening, 3-6 feet of storm surge from Hurricane Irma as it moves closer to Florida.

Related: Hurricane season: What’s a watch, what’s a warning?

Make it easy to keep up-to-date with more stories like this. Download the 10 News app now.

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© 2017 WTSP-TV

Article source: http://www.king5.com/weather/florida-braces-for-hurricane-irma-watches-warnings-now-in-effect/472246167

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South Florida under hurricane warning as Irma approaches

Update 11 p.m.: South Florida is now under a hurricane warning as Irma approaches the peninsula.

The maximum sustained winds have weakened a bit to 165 mph, but remains a strong Category 5 hurricane.

The chance of tropical storm-force winds has risen to 93 percent in West Palm Beach. Hurricane chance is 47 percent, according to forecasters.

Update 8 p.m.: Hurricane Irma’s top winds remained at 175 mph about 55 miles west of Grand Turk Island as it maintained a course aimed at South Florida.

The Category 5 storm continues moving northwest at about 16 mph, holding a collision course with South Florida where it could be a strong Category 4 storm by Sunday. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles from the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 185 miles, giving it a damaging reach as wide as the state itself.

The dangers of storm surge and hurricane winds this strong are “life threatening,” Robert Molleda, warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Miami, stressed again in an 8:30 p.m briefing.

Minutes later, Gov. Rick Scott ordered mandatory evacuations from seven cities around Lake Okeechobee Friday: South Bay, Lake Harbor, Pahokee, Moore Haven, Clewiston, Belle Glade and Canal Point.

A statement from Scott’s office said, “Based on recent forecasts, the U.S. Army Corps has been reviewing how the federally operated Herbert Hoover Dike will be impacted. Governor Scott spoke to Col. Jason Kirk with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers today and the Corps believes there will be additional impacts from excessive wind pushing some water over the Dike. While they have assured the Governor that the structural integrity of the Dike will not be compromised, Governor Scott has ordered voluntary evacuations beginning immediately in the cities surrounding the southern half of Lake Okeechobee from Lake Port to Canal Point in Hendry, Palm Beach and Glades counties.”

Earlier Thursday, Scott said, “We cannot save you once the storm hits. Once there is an evacuation order, get out.”

As motorists clogged major arteries, Scott urged residents not to take more gas than they need at stations that have supplies.

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for Jupiter Inlet southward around the Florida peninsula to Bonita Beach, including the Florida Keys, Lake Okeechobee and Florida Bay.

A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for Jupiter Inlet southward around the Florida peninsula to Bonita Beach.

 


Update 5 p.m.:  Hurricane Irma remains a powerful Category 5 storm aimed at Florida where it is expected to make landfall as a strong Category 4 on Sunday.

Tropical storm-force winds are expected in Palm Beach County by Saturday afternoon with hurricane force-winds hitting predawn Sunday.

The National Weather Service in Miami used strong language in describing the potential impacts of Irma, including “complete destruction of mobile homes.”

“Structural damage to sturdy buildings, numerous large trees snapped or uprooted, widespread power and communication outages,” said meteorologist Kevin Scharfenberg. “We’d rather not focus on category because a Category 3 to 5 means real risk of life-threatening destructive winds.”

 

National Hurricane Center forecasters said the strong Bermuda High nudged Irma’s path further south and west.

A hurricane watch is in effect for Jupiter Inlet south around the tip of the peninsula and Lake Okeechobee. A storm surge watch is also in effect for the same area. A “watch” means there is an estimated 48 hours before hurricane-force winds will hit an area.

Update 2 p.m.:  Hurricane Irma is heading toward the Turks and Caicos Islands with 175 mph winds and moving west-northwest at 16 mph.

A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for:
*  Jupiter Inlet southward around the Florida peninsula to Bonita
Beach
* Florida Keys

A Hurricane Watch is in effect for:
* Jupiter Inlet southward around the Florida peninsula to Bonita
Beach
* Florida Keys
* Lake Okeechobee
* Florida Bay
* Cuba from Matanzas province eastward to Guantanamo province

Watch: Live Irma webcam of downtown West Palm Beach. 

Update 1 p.m.:  The National Weather Service has issued a Hurricane Irma threat graphic to give you a better idea of what to expect.

Update 11 a.m.: A hurricane watch has been issued for the Florida Peninsula from Jupiter Inlet south, including Lake Okeechobee.

A storm surge watch has also been issued for Jupiter Inlet south around the peninsula to Bonita Beach including the Florida Keys.

A watch is issued 48 hours before hurricane or storm surge conditions are expected in the area.

As of the 11 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center, Irma’s winds were at 175 mph and heading west-northwest at 16 mph. The minimum central pressure was 921 mb.

Watch: Live Irma webcam of downtown West Palm Beach. 

Forecasters said there has been no change in the track guidance, which brings the core of Irma to southeast Florida in about three days as a major hurricane.

While the winds may have slowed slightly from their high of 185 mph, National Hurricane Center forecasters said there is nothing to weaken the storm as it moves closer to Florida.

Hurricane force-winds extend outward up to 60 miles form the center of Irma. Tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 185 miles.

“We know it will come very close to South Florida, but 50 miles will make all the difference between tens of billions of dollars and a few billion dollars,” said Jeff Masters, a hurricane expert and co-founder of Weather Underground. “The thing to emphasize is if you are in the cone, you are in the cone, you are in danger of a direct hit.”

Storm surge inundation levels are available on the National Hurricane Center’s website. 

Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

Update 8 a.m.:  Hurricane Irma maintained its 180 mph wind speed this morning as it strafes the Dominican Republic and nears vulnerable Haiti.

Previous story: Hurricane Irma continued its ominous trek toward Florida overnight with little change in forecast path or wind intensity.

As of the 5 a.m. update from the National Hurricane Center, Irma was a 180-mph major tropical cyclone moving west-northwest at 17 mph.

Under the current forecast, the center of Irma will be just north of Palm Beach County at 8 p.m. Sunday. Tropical storm-force winds could begin late Friday.

Watch: Live Irma webcam of downtown West Palm Beach. 

Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

Forecasters said Irma may weaken slightly in its westward path, but that it will likely make landfall in Florida as a Category 4 hurricane.

While the center of the track is taking the storm along the east coast of the state, all of the Florida peninsula remains in the cone, and forecasters pleaded that people not focus on the center of the forecast track.

Track errors at forecast days 4 and 5 are between 175 to 225 miles.

Hurricane watches for the Keys and South Florida are expected today.

A hurricane watch means you have approximately 48 hours before hurricane-force winds reach your area. A warning is issued 36 hours in advance.

At 4 a.m. Irma was passing north of the eastern Dominican Republic and was 225 miles east-southeast of Grand Turk Island.

While Irma is not forecast to reach Florida until Sunday, tropical storm-force winds are possible as early as Friday night in portions of extreme South Florida and officials are urging everyone to have preparations complete by then.

“This is a growing and serious situation,” said Kevin Scharfenberg, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Miami. “We have lots of computer models, not just one, and, unfortunately, they are in very good agreement right now that there will be a hurricane in the neighborhood this weekend.”

“People need to act as if they are sure the storm is coming at its worst, even if we can’t be sure the worst is coming,” said Bryan Norcross, a Weather Channel hurricane expert who is credited with saving lives during Hurricane Andrew when he was a Miami meteorologist. “If the storm were to go right up Interstate 95, it would be worse than Wilma, significantly worse.”

Hurricane Wilma, the last storm to bear that name, hit on the west coast of Florida with Category 3-force. By the time it reached Palm Beach County, it was a Category 2.

Eric Blake, a National Hurricane Center scientist, said seeing powerhouse Irma so closely follow devastating Hurricane Harvey reminded him of the 2004-2005 storm seasons that ripped Florida from the Panhandle to Palm Beach.

“Ugh,” he said.

Perhaps at no time in history has the atmosphere been so scrutinized as this week with dozens of weather balloons launching daily across the belly of the country to measure an upper-level trough that plays a crucial role in Irma’s forecast.

It’s that trough, which is digging east with the jet stream, that could tug Irma north into a weak area on the west side of the Bermuda High and steer it to the east of Florida.

While the that path would be similar to Hurricane Matthew in 2016, forecasters said Irma is a more difficult storm to predict at this point because Matthew was coming from the south, after having already made a right turn.

“Irma is coming in from the southeast, and these storms from the southeast are much more problematic because they have to make a stronger turn,” said Dan Kottlowski, a hurricane expert with AccuWeather. “In this sense, it’s more dangerous than Matthew.”

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