What a Gardens professor is doing to save reefs — and why they matter

The countless critters that dwell in the shallow waters around the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse got three new mini-apartments to call home recently, thanks to Palm Beach State College Professor Jessica Miles and her crew.


RELATED: County makes former drug ship part of artificial reef

They went to work just before dawn, preparing to dive 12 feet to the sea floor, where they bolted down three, 20-pound structures made to mimic coral reefs.


RELATED: Jupiter Inlet comes alive this week: Grouper, turtles, nurse sharks

They’re participating in a global study of biodiversity. Miles calls her research the Reef Hope Project. The status of coral is dire, she said.

Anchor damage, snorkelers who accidentally kick the reefs, warming oceans, coral bleaching and more carbon dioxide absorbed into the ocean all threaten coral, Miles said.









“I can’t emphasize enough how much we need to do more with the issue of climate change and to recognize the value of reefs, because when we have storms come through, it protects us and lessens inland flooding,” she said.


RELATED: State evaluating reported damage on coral reefs off Palm Beach

Coral reefs are the bases of the food chain, and much of the local economy depends on fishing and tourism, she said.

People need to curb carbon dioxide emissions and improve water quality that’s been hurt by pollution and runoff, Miles said.

“We can’t just sit back and hope that Mother Nature will be able to get healthy on her own,” she said.

For now, artificial reefs are sustaining fish populations and adding new niches — but it’s vital to protect natural reefs, Miles said.

Hundreds of Palm Beach State College students at the college’s Palm Beach Gardens campus will be involved by the time her research project is finished, she said.

Anchoring the reefs

Engineering students assembled the structures for her pre-dive.

Two students, a rescue diver and an adjunct professor who captained the boat joined her on a Nov. 3 dive. Other students took water samples and photographs.

Freshman Stephanie Rochefort said she lived for two years in Australia, where she saw the Great Barrier Reef, so the research project appealed to her.

“She caught my interest and sold me on it, and so far, it’s been great. It’s been more fun than anything,” Rochefort said.

Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Outstanding Natural Area staff determined the placement of the reef modules and prepared the locations.

At the first spot on the south side of the lighthouse, Miles fought a raging current that threatened to tear away one of her flippers and caused her to drop the module. The rescue diver father of one of her students recovered it.

She was able to anchor it to a cement block with four steel legs that penetrated 18 inches into the sediment. The module, a square frame of stacked PVC plates, will stay submerged for about three years. That will give marine life such as coral and oysters a chance to attach and flourish.

The scientists fastened the second structure in a shallower location on the east side of the lighthouse in a matter of minutes. They had eight- to 10-foot visibility, and there was no current ripping them along, so they could use both hands for work, Miles said.

Natural area staff paddled out to the mangrove lagoon with the third module on a makeshift raft between two paddle boards. Miles and her team sunk the module on the north side of Beach Road, east of the lighthouse, a safe distance from the mangroves and sea grass beds.

Tracking growth

Three years from now, they will haul up the fish houses — autonomous reef monitoring structures, as they’re formally known — to study the occupants.

Biotechnology students will do genetic testing on the species they can’t visually identify and share the results with the Smithsonian Global Marine Biodiversity Project and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s coral reef monitoring program, Miles said.

Miles and her students track the locations of each of the structures using GPS. Scientists around the world are using the same autonomous reef monitoring systems so they can compare which environments are most attractive to different species of marine life.

Miles previously deployed two other modules 50 to 60 feet deep near the Andrew “Red” Harris Foundation reef about 1 1/2 miles from the Jupiter Inlet.

Miles attached five tiles made of different materials to that reef. They’ll stay under the sea for about a year. Then she’ll examine them under a microscope to determine which material supports the most coral growth.

Recreational divers can also participate; the Andrew “Red” Harris Reef structures have a unique number tag, so divers can provide information and photographs to help scientists understand how the artificial reef changes over time, she said.

The college’s Environmental Science Department staff and students will also analyze data that the Palm Beach County Reef Research Team has collected from all the natural and artificial reefs in the county since 1991, Miles said.

The Geographic Information Systems class is working on mapping the Reef Hope Project, producing data-driven maps that show the research results, she said.

Eventually, Miles wants to work with engineering technology to add electrical stimulation to some of her modules. Corals and oysters tend to settle faster and grow faster near low voltage electricity, she said.

Art and environmental students will work with local organizations to create an “EcoArt,” functional art that benefits the environmental. They will design an artificial reef that adds marine habitat and inspires people to care more about the environment, Miles said.


Article source: http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/local/what-gardens-professor-doing-save-reefs-and-why-they-matter/wKrBFejDM9HB90i8JkPYOI/

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Palm Beach asks: How did buried utilities perform during Irma?

Palm Beach’s plan to bury all overhead utility lines on the island has ignited a debate about the pros and cons of an underground system.

Proponents say that, apart from their aesthetic superiority, buried power lines eliminate service interruptions caused by storm winds or conflicts with tree limbs.

But opponents question whether buried utility lines are worth the steep conversion cost which, in Palm Beach’s case, works out to more than $2 million per mile. Another concern: on a barrier island, are buried lines and on-the-ground transformers vulnerable to outages caused by flooding?

It’s a safe bet that Palm Beach officials were watching closely how other barrier-island towns with buried utilities fared during Hurricane Irma, which roared through on Sept 10. Palm Beach plans to bury all of its overhead lines over the next several years; construction began this summer.

In Palm Beach, all 9,600 customers lost power during Irma and it took a week to get everyone restored. According to Florida Power Light, about 33 miles of lines in Palm Beach are underground, or about 47 percent of the town. But the entire town receives power from main lines that reach the island beneath the Intracoastal Waterway.

Leaders of four barrier island towns contacted for this story — two of which have completely buried their utilities and two of which are working toward that goal – all said Irma affirmed their belief in the superiority of undergrounded systems.



In Jupiter Inlet Colony, power, cable and internet remained in service for all 240 households for the duration of the Sept. 10 hurricane, which thrashed the exclusive residential hamlet with 80-mph winds, Mayor Dan Comerford said.

“We were sitting in our air-conditioned houses throughout the night and it was fantastic,” he said. “Once you go underground, you are a true believer.”

Jupiter Inlet Colony gets electricity from a power station six miles to the south. Power comes through storm-hardened lines – the poles are made of concrete or a composite and are two to three times taller than traditional wooden poles — along U.S. 1.

The town spent $2.6 million to bury all its utilities after suffering power outages that dragged on for days after hurricanes Frances, Jeanne and Wilma, he said.

In Longboat Key, near Sarasota, the 6,000 customers with buried utilities experienced little if any power interruptions, Town Manager Dave Bullock said. But it wasn’t the same story for those with overhead service. Roughly half of those 4,000 customers lost power and some were still without it a week after the storm, Bullock said.

“We let residents back on the island at 4 p.m. on Monday, the day after the storm,” he said. “As far as I know, at that point all the underground-area residents had power, and we had 2,200 overhead customers still without power.”

Tree damage and blown debris was the reason for most of the outages, he said.

Many of Longboat Key’s properties were built with underground utilities in the 1980s. In 2015, town voters approved a $25 million bond issue to finance the burial of all overhead lines.

No magic bullet

Despite their advantages, buried power systems are no panacea against service interruptions. The entire towns of Golden Beach and Gulfstream lost power despite having buried utilities for all or a large portion of their properties. The managers in both towns said that’s because FPL’s main lines, which carry power to them, are overhead.

Golden Beach, in northeastern Miami-Dade County, has a fully undergrounded utility system. But all 390 properties lost power from Sept. 10 until Sept. 14, Town Manager Alexander Diaz said.

“Even though we are below ground, the lines that energize our community are still above ground,” he said.

Those lines come through nearby communities that have overhead power. “If their systems were undergrounded, we would have had no issue,” Diaz said.

When power came back, it was immediately restored to the entire island except for six homes that were served by a damaged circuit, he said. They had power back in another 48 hours.

Golden Beach spent $7 million to bury its utilities five years ago as part of a larger infrastructure project.

“We’re glad we did it,” Diaz said. Had the town’s lines still been overhead when Irma struck, “we would have had to re-wire the community, then re-energize. Because on a barrier island like we are, the likelihood of wires coming down is 100 percent.”

In Gulf Stream, an affluent town along State Road A1A in Palm Beach County, the town is in the last phase of converting all of its 500-plus homes to underground utilities. Voters approved a $5.5 million referendum in 2012 to bury all power, cable television and phone lines.

Town Manager Greg Dunham said that, even though Irma did no damage to utilities in the undergrounded areas, the entire town was without power for five days after the storm. That was because of damage to the main lines bringing power to the island, he said.

Once power was restored, problems remained on the north side of the island, where utilities are still overhead.

“We had a couple of poles that were leaning and being held up by the wires,” he said. “One took six hours to replace … the last streets to power up again were ones where utility poles had to be replaced.”

Dunham said he remains a strong believer in underground utilities. If power fails during a storm, “we will know it won’t be any of our infrastructure causing the power outage.”

Palm Beach Town Manager Tom Bradford said overhead main lines shouldn’t be an issue for the town once island-wide utility burial is completed.

“All lines will reconnect to the mainland (in West Palm Beach) and all of the connection points will ultimately be hardened, from the edge of Lake Worth to the substation where the power is coming from that feeds Palm Beach,” he said.

Flooding not a concern

None of the transformers in Gulf Stream, Jupiter Inlet Colony or Longboat Key were flooded during Irma, their respective leaders said.

“We are a barrier island but have not been under water since the 1920s,” Bullock said of Longboat Key. In any case, “the new systems are designed to be outside and to be exposed to the elements.” Besides, elevation can be added beneath transformers in the lowest areas of the island, he said.

Diaz said Golden Beach’s transformers were flooded during Irma but the water had receded by the time FPL restored power. “Flooding was not an issue,” he said.

The electrical wires are encased in conduit. The only places were the undergrounded system is vulnerable to water intrusion are where the electrical wires connect to the transformers and where they connect to the homes, he said.

Jupiter Inlet Colony’s elevation ranges from 6 to 17 feet above sea level, and averages 11 feet in most places, Comerford said. The town also has a state-of-the-art system for managing stormwater runoff.

“Even with 10 inches of rain in this hurricane, we did not even have a puddle,” he said.

Steven Stern, Palm Beach’s underground utilities project manager, said the town contacted Comerford, Dunham, Diaz and Bullock as part of its own post-Irma inquiry. Stern said he was told that the storm cleanup was simpler, safer and quicker in areas where there were no downed poles or electrical wires to clear.

“The responses were overwhelmingly positive about their underground systems,” he said.

*

Town Hurricane and Utilities Report

What: Public forum on hurricane recovery and underground utilities hosted by the Palm Beach Civic Association

When: 10 a.m. Nov. 16

Where: The Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea, 141 S. County Road

For information: Call 655-0820 or visit PalmBeachCivic.org/events


Article source: http://www.palmbeachdailynews.com/news/local/palm-beach-asks-how-did-buried-utilities-perform-during-irma/Od33LgBQ4tsq6EdChHf2eM/

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8th Grader on Surfboard Saves Man from Capsized Boat

The eighth grader who rescued a boater from a capsizing boat in Jupiter, Fla. is speaking out. Drone footage captured the action as a wave capsized a boat in Jupiter Inlet Friday, leaving the boater helpless until 13-year-old Sam Ruskin came to his aid. The drone captured the teenager passing a surfboard to the stricken man, leading him away from the rocks. This impressive youngster is modest about his role in saving the adult’s life.

Article source: http://www.insideedition.com/media/videos/8th-grader-surfboard-saves-man-capsized-boat-37688

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Teen Surfer Rescues Man as Drone’s Camera Captures Heroics

A teen surfer rescued a man from treacherous currents after his boat capsized at Jupiter Inlet in Florida and the 13-year-old’s heroics were captured by a camera-equipped drone.

Sam Ruskin was out surfing on Friday when he saw a 24-foot boat tossed onto its side and the man on board struggling to swim through choppy waves reaching three to four feet, My Palm Beach reported.

Ruskin paddled over to the man, offered him his surfboard, then helped get the distressed safely to shore.

“He said thanks when we got to the beach,” said Ruskin, per My Palm Beach. “He was in shock. He was calm.”

The entire episode was caught on camera by drone pilot Kevin Cadby who, according to Fox News, was flying his remote-controlled craft at Jupiter Inlet to capture video footage of the water and boats.

“The wind was blowing in at 20+ miles per hour, that inlet can be treacherous,” Cadby said, per Fox News.

“My first concern was to make sure nobody else was on the boat,” he added, recalling how he flew his drone over the capsized vessel.

The name of the man thrown overboard from the capsized boat hasn’t been released.

South Florida’s inlets have been the site of numerous tragedies over the years, most recently claiming the life of a 21-year-old swimmer, Amantay Brown, who was swept out to sea on Oct. 19, The Sun Sentinel reported.

In 2015 a 15-year-old boy drowned at the Jupiter Inlet after he was pulled into the inlet by a strong current and, in 2012, a diver died in the Hillsboro Inlet when she was thrown from a capsizing boat that was struck by a large wave.

Article source: https://www.newsmax.com/TheWire/teen-surfer-rescue/2017/11/01/id/823432/

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The First Lifesavers At The Jupiter Inlet

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JUPITER, FL – November 3, 2017 – In early 1986, I started working as an Ocean Lifeguard for Palm Beach County, Florida. Quite often, my assignment was at Carlin Park in Jupiter. On busy days, there were only two guards assigned to monitor beachgoers from the Carlin lifeguard tower, the one lifeguard tower on the south end. The tower was a wooden structure, with a long gradual ramp towards the beach. We were constantly pounding down nails that popped up, so we wouldn’t cut our feet. Rescues were made, sometimes starting with a full run from the top of the ramp.

Approximately 100 years before I was hired, the United States Life-Saving Service (USLSS) had built a lifesaving station near there to respond to vessels in distress near the inlet. On one of the memorial signs placed by the Seminole Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the names of the “gallant” men who worked at the Jupiter Inlet Station are listed.

The Surfmen

Who were these men and how did they go about their work at Jupiter Inlet in the late 1800’s? Those named on the sign are: Captain Charles R. Carlin, John H. Grant, Charles W. Carlin, Harry Dubois, Graham King, Daniel Ross, and Fred Powell. Some others who served are Henry Archibald (who became station keeper at Indian River and Bethel), Nelson Cowles, and Tom Mitchell. Here are a few brief biographies.

Captain Carlin was born in 1842 in Dublin, Ireland to English parents. He served in the British Navy before coming to Florida to be a geodetic surveyor. He served as assistant lighthouse keeper at the nearby Jupiter Lighthouse, and in 1885 was named Captain (sometimes referred to as “Keeper”) of the USLSS station. Carlin Park is named after Captain Carlin.

Surfman Henry “Harry” DuBois was a member of a pioneer family which had built a home at Jupiter Inlet on top of an ancient Indian shell mound. The restored house is still on the site and a county park surrounds it named DuBois Park. Harry also worked in the pineapple and beekeeping businesses.

Surfman John Grant served as postmaster and mailman in Hobe Sound. Graham King was Captain Carlin’s son in law. Charles Wesley Carlin was Captain Carlin’s son.  

Captain Charles Robert Carlin

The Station

The lifesaving station was a two-story structure built on a bluff a mile south of the Jupiter Inlet, with a four-sided lookout tower on the roof, where there were signal flags and a powerful spyglass mounted on a tripod. On the ground floor was a cloak room, a utility room, and a self-bailing lifeboat mounted on a wagon on top of a wooden ramp that led down to the beach. The second floor contained the crew’s quarters, iron cots, and lockers.  

At the time that the Jupiter Inlet station was in operation, the inlet was natural—it shoaled and changed course. The Loxahatchee River (which fed the inlet) emptied into the Atlantic Ocean as far south as the current Jupiter Beach Resort.

Starting on September 1, 1886, Captain Carlin supervised six paid Surfmen from roughly September through May each year, while serving alone during the summer when the ocean was generally calmer. A report from 1896 stated that the Captain’s salary was $2,000/year, while the Surfmen were paid $60-65/month.

There were six-hour shifts, with one Surfman in the tower, one Surfman patrolling the beach to the south, and another to the north. The Surfman drilled regularly, including practice with a Lyle gun and a breeches buoy apparatus.  

Surfmen (from left to right); Graham W. King, Sr., Charlie W. Carlin (standing), John Grant, Dan Ross, Tom Mitchell, and Henry “Harry” DuBois (arms folded)

The rescues

The following are three selected (verbatim) entries from the 1890’s:

April 3, 1896 – American schooner Belle – About 3:30 A.M. the patrolman was hailed from a small schooner, which had anchored the preceding evening near the station, on the edge of the Breakers. Being unable to understand them, the patrolman swam off to the vessel and ascertained that her crew of two men were desirous of beaching her. He warned them against so doing, and returning ashore reported the matter to the keeper. As the sea was making, and the wind gathering force, the keeper sent Surfmen Nos. 1 and 4 on board, with instructions to carry her to Lake Worth. The surf was now breaking over the schooner, and finding her crew demoralized, the life-savers slipped the cables and stood offshore in a heavy sea and half a gale of wind. The vessel was unable to stand the force of the waves even when hove to, so they were compelled to scud, which carried them past Lake Worth before daylight, and determined them to hold their course for New River Inlet, 60 miles south of Jupiter, where they crossed the bar in safety, and beat up to Fort Lauderdale House of Refuge, reaching there at 3:30 P.M. There, they left the vessel in charge of the keeper, who took them two miles in his boat to the railroad station, and furnished them with funds to carry them home, where they arrived at 10 A.M., April 4.

February 9, 1892 – Medical aid given – Word having been received that a man had accidentally shot himself, the keeper hastened to carry necessary medicines and bandages with which the wound was properly dressed.

February 6, 1895 – Rescue from drowning – A young man with a party of friends went into the surf near the station. Being unable to swim, the keeper loaned him a life preserver, but he was nevertheless carried out by the undertow and was in danger of being overcome and drowned in the rough water, when Surfman Charles M. (sic) Carlin heroically swam out to his relief and assisted him ashore. This action was very bold, and resulted in saving the imperiled bather’s life.

United States Life-Saving Station, Jupiter Inlet 1890s (left) and after the 1900s (right)

Decommissioning

No Surfmen were employed after 1896. Captain Carlin remained employed, recruiting volunteers during emergencies. The USLSS at Jupiter Inlet was decommissioned January 21, 1899. Captain Carlin died in 1912 from injuries incurred while trying to save the remnant life saving station from a brush fire.

The Shifting Sands

Well over 100 years have passed since the Jupiter Inlet station was decommissioned. One day, I decided to find the spot where it was built. USLSS records many times referred to it being located one mile south of the Jupiter Inlet at Latitude 26 55 30 North, and 80 04 00 West, and built, “on a bluff for good viewing.” I started at a sign in front of the Lazy Loggerhead Restaurant near the main parking lot in Carlin Park which states that the Station “was built at this site.”

Florida Heritage Landmark sign at Carlin Park sponsored by the Town of Jupiter and The Florida Department of State

Standing by this sign, I opened my compass app on my smart phone. The compass includes coordinates in degrees, minutes, and seconds. My reading here was: Latitude 26 55 47 North, Longitude
80 04 06 West. Since latitude is measured north of the equator, I was 17 seconds north of the former station coordinate, and six seconds west of the longitude coordinate. I started walking south on the Carlin Park road with my smart phone. I left the park road near the current Carlin south lifeguard tower, and continued south along the sidewalk on A1A. Very close to the southern boundary of Carlin Park, and near Beach Access #57, my compass equaled the published Station Latitude of 26 55 30 North. My longitude reading here was 80 04 03 West. So I turned east, walked down the Beach Access #57 stairs to the beach and walked directly to the shoreline near high tide. My final reading here was: Latitude 26 55 30 North, Longitude 80 04 02 West (very close here to the desired location, only two seconds west of where I was seeking). I was approximately .35 miles south of my starting point at the historical marker sign. two seconds of longitude at this latitude is roughly 50 meters. The Jupiter Inlet Life Saving Station in 1886 was built in a location that is now underwater!  

Sources:

United States Life Saving Services Annual Reports (United States Coast Guard Records).

“Five Thousand Years on the Loxahatchee”, by James D. Snyder.

Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum, Josh Liller – Historian and Collections Manager.

This article originally appeared in American Lifeguard Magazine in a different form.

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Article source: http://www.injupiter.com/jupiter-florida-stories/the-first-lifesavers-at-the-jupiter-inlet/259

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Drone video captures 13-year-old rescuing man whose boat capsized in Jupiter Inlet

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Kevin Cadby, a drone operator from Palm Beach Gardens, captured the moment a 13-year-old boy rescued a man whose fishing boat sank Oct. 27 in Jupiter Inlet. CONTRIBUTED VIDEO BY KEVIN CADBY

JUPITER — Sam Ruskin was surfing with his cousin in the Jupiter Inlet late Friday when he noticed a bunch of people gathered at the end of the jetty on the southern side of the inlet.

The 13-year-old said he saw containers floating away from a fishing boat that had just capsized and then noticed a man struggling against the current near the rocks that form the jetty’s base.

The man wasn’t wearing a life jacket, and Sam said the sea was choppy because of strong winds.

“If you don’t get out of there you could easily drown,” Sam recalled thinking. ”He looked out of breath and tired.”

He knew he had to help.

“I paddled out to where he was and told him to get on my surfboard,” Sam said. “He looked pretty shocked. He got on the board and I paddled him in, and he said thank you and I went back to surfing.”

More: 5 rescued after two boats collide, overturn in Sebastian Inlet

Although Sam, who is in eighth grade at Independence Middle School, “didn’t really think it was that much of a big deal,” his dad, Ryan Ruskin, saw things differently.

“I was shocked, just ecstatic with pride,” Ryan Ruskin said. 

He said his son had mentioned something about helping someone at the inlet when he picked him up Friday night, but he didn’t realize how dramatic the incident was until one of his friends shared the drone video on Facebook later that weekend.

“It’s really a very dangerous area. Someone dies in that inlet every year,” Ryan Ruskin said. ”He was just like, ‘What’s up? What are we doing tonight? What’s for dinner?’”

Kevin Cadby, of Palm Beach Gardens, said he had been flying a drone over the area all afternoon. 

“It wasn’t really sunny and the water wasn’t that beautiful blue,” Cadby said. 

So after a while, he turned to “chasing boats.”

More: Sheriff’s helicopter deployed to rescue men on capsized boat near Sebastian Inlet

Cadby was standing along the jetty at the southern end of the inlet, peering out of binoculars and videoing boats as they approached the inlet.

“I saw a little fishing boat coming in,” he said. “And I stuck with him the entire time.”

He said the boat laid off the throttle as it entered the rough waters of the inlet, leading waves to sink the vessel in a matter of minutes. He said he watched the boat’s only passenger until he was safely on land.

Once Sam helped the man to shore, he was checked out by rescue officials but left uninjured. 

More: Three men rescued near Sebastian Inlet after boat capsizes in rough seas

“My heart thumps every time I watch that video still,” Cadby said.

Cadby said he and Sam plan to team up in the near future to capture drone video of the boy surfing.

Article source: https://www.tallahassee.com/story/news/local/martin-county/2017/10/30/drone-video-captures-13-year-old-rescuing-man-whose-boat-capsized-jupiter-inlet/812826001/

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Drone video captures 13-year-old rescuing man whose boat capsized

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Kevin Cadby, a drone operator from Palm Beach Gardens, captured the moment a 13-year-old boy rescued a man whose fishing boat sank Oct. 27 in Jupiter Inlet. CONTRIBUTED VIDEO BY KEVIN CADBY

JUPITER, Fla. — Sam Ruskin was surfing with his cousin in the Jupiter Inlet late Friday when he noticed a bunch of people gathered at the end of the jetty on the southern side of the inlet.

The 13-year-old said he saw containers floating away from a fishing boat that had just capsized and then noticed a man struggling against the current near the rocks that form the jetty’s base.

The man wasn’t wearing a life jacket, and Sam said the sea was choppy because of strong winds.

“If you don’t get out of there you could easily drown,” Sam recalled thinking. ”He looked out of breath and tired.”

He knew he had to help.

“I paddled out to where he was and told him to get on my surfboard,” Sam said. “He looked pretty shocked. He got on the board and I paddled him in, and he said thank you and I went back to surfing.”

Although Sam, who is in eighth grade at Independence Middle School, “didn’t really think it was that much of a big deal,” his dad, Ryan Ruskin, saw things differently.

“I was shocked, just ecstatic with pride,” Ryan Ruskin said. 

More: Ship with 2 Hawaiian women rescued after 6 months at sea reaches Japan

More: ‘Rescuer becomes victim’: 65-year-old dies after rescuing man from drowning

He said his son had mentioned something about helping someone at the inlet when he picked him up Friday night, but he didn’t realize how dramatic the incident was until one of his friends shared the drone video on Facebook later that weekend.

“It’s really a very dangerous area. Someone dies in that inlet every year,” Ryan Ruskin said. ”He was just like, ‘What’s up? What are we doing tonight? What’s for dinner?’”

Kevin Cadby, of Palm Beach Gardens, said he had been flying a drone over the area all afternoon. 

“It wasn’t really sunny and the water wasn’t that beautiful blue,” Cadby said. 

So after a while, he turned to “chasing boats.”

Cadby was standing along the jetty at the southern end of the inlet, peering out of binoculars and videoing boats as they approached the inlet.

“I saw a little fishing boat coming in,” he said. “And I stuck with him the entire time.”

He said the boat laid off the throttle as it entered the rough waters of the inlet, leading waves to sink the vessel in a matter of minutes. He said he watched the boat’s only passenger until he was safely on land.

Once Sam helped the man to shore, he was checked out by rescue officials but left uninjured. 

“My heart thumps every time I watch that video still,” Cadby said.

Cadby said he and Sam plan to team up in the near future to capture drone video of the boy surfing.

Follow Mary Helen Moore on Twitter: @maryhelenmoore

Article source: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/10/30/drone-video-captures-13-year-old-rescuing-man-whose-boat-capsized/816114001/

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8th Grader on Surfboard Saves Man from Capsized Boat | Inside …

The eighth grader who rescued a boater from a capsizing boat in Jupiter, Fla. is speaking out. Drone footage captured the action as a wave capsized a boat in Jupiter Inlet Friday, leaving the boater helpless until 13-year-old Sam Ruskin came to his aid. The drone captured the teenager passing a surfboard to the stricken man, leading him away from the rocks. This impressive youngster is modest about his role in saving the adult’s life.

Article source: http://www.insideedition.com/media/videos/8th-grader-surfboard-saves-man-capsized-boat-37688

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Drone video captures surfer,13, rescuing man after his boat capsizes

by: Bill DiPaolo, Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Updated: Oct 31, 2017 – 9:30 PM

JUPITER, Fla. – A 13-year-old Jupiter, Florida, surfer rescued a boater Friday in the Jupiter Inlet, well known to locals as a dangerous waterway.

The video taken of Sam, an eighth-grader at Independence Middle School, went viral. Taken by a drone, the video shows Ruskin swimming out to the struggling man, placing him stomach-down on his surf board and pushing him to the south side of the inlet.

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“He could have drowned,” said Ruskin, who wants to be a professional surfer. “He could have been pulled into the current. He could have been pushed against the rocks.”

The video shows the boat powering into the inlet. A wave rolls over the stern, tumbling the bow into the surf. A man in an orange shirt, without a life preserver, climbs out. He struggles to swim to the south side of the inlet.

Sam was surfing with his cousin Reese about 4:30 p.m. on the south side of the inlet when they saw the 24-boat boat coming in, against the outgoing tide. People on the jetty began pointing to the water. Sam saw floating white boxes, then the man struggling.

“It was choppy. The waves were 3-4 feet,” Sam said.

The tennager paddled over to help the man, who Sam estimated to be in his 30s or 40s. He gave up his white, black and green surfboard to the floundering swimmer. They paddled to the south side of the inlet. The man never lost consciousness.

“He said thanks when we got to the beach. He was in shock. He was calm,” Sam said.

Fire-rescue officials arrived about 5:30 p.m., according to Capt. Albert Borroto of Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. The boater was not injured. His name was not released. The boat sank and was not recovered.

Ryan Ruskin picked up his son Friday night at Reese’s house. Ryan had not heard anything about the rescue.

“Sam told me he rescued a guy in the inlet. He didn’t make a big deal out of it,” said Ryan Ruskin, an attorney who also likes to surf.

Then first thing Sunday morning, a friend of Ryan’s told him about a video he posted on Facebook of a boater scuttling in the Jupiter Inlet. Ryan called up the video.

“That’s my son!” Ryan said.

Since then, Sam has been interviewed by several media outlets, including CBS’ “Inside Edition” and London’s Daily Mail. The Ruskins have not heard from the rescued boater.

“I’m proud of Sam. He’s a strong swimmer. We’re in the ocean all the time. He did the right thing,” Ryan said.

The Jupiter Inlet is dangerous for swimmers and boaters. Recent incidents include:

Andrew “Red” Harris, 24, drowned while snorkeling in the Jupiter Inlet in June 2014.

* Edwin Castañon, 15, drowned while swimming at Dubois Park in 2015.

Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen left the Jupiter Inlet in a 19-foot boat in July 2015. The two 14-year-old boys never returned.

Article source: http://www.wsbtv.com/news/trending-now/drone-video-captures-surfer13-rescuing-man-after-his-boat-capsizes/635311530

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Drone video captures surfer,13, rescuing man after his boat capsizes

by: Bill DiPaolo, Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Updated: Oct 31, 2017 – 9:30 PM

JUPITER, Fla. – A 13-year-old Jupiter, Florida, surfer rescued a boater Friday in the Jupiter Inlet, well known to locals as a dangerous waterway.

The video taken of Sam, an eighth-grader at Independence Middle School, went viral. Taken by a drone, the video shows Ruskin swimming out to the struggling man, placing him stomach-down on his surf board and pushing him to the south side of the inlet.

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“He could have drowned,” said Ruskin, who wants to be a professional surfer. “He could have been pulled into the current. He could have been pushed against the rocks.”

The video shows the boat powering into the inlet. A wave rolls over the stern, tumbling the bow into the surf. A man in an orange shirt, without a life preserver, climbs out. He struggles to swim to the south side of the inlet.

Sam was surfing with his cousin Reese about 4:30 p.m. on the south side of the inlet when they saw the 24-boat boat coming in, against the outgoing tide. People on the jetty began pointing to the water. Sam saw floating white boxes, then the man struggling.

“It was choppy. The waves were 3-4 feet,” Sam said.

The tennager paddled over to help the man, who Sam estimated to be in his 30s or 40s. He gave up his white, black and green surfboard to the floundering swimmer. They paddled to the south side of the inlet. The man never lost consciousness.

“He said thanks when we got to the beach. He was in shock. He was calm,” Sam said.

Fire-rescue officials arrived about 5:30 p.m., according to Capt. Albert Borroto of Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. The boater was not injured. His name was not released. The boat sank and was not recovered.

Ryan Ruskin picked up his son Friday night at Reese’s house. Ryan had not heard anything about the rescue.

“Sam told me he rescued a guy in the inlet. He didn’t make a big deal out of it,” said Ryan Ruskin, an attorney who also likes to surf.

Then first thing Sunday morning, a friend of Ryan’s told him about a video he posted on Facebook of a boater scuttling in the Jupiter Inlet. Ryan called up the video.

“That’s my son!” Ryan said.

Since then, Sam has been interviewed by several media outlets, including CBS’ “Inside Edition” and London’s Daily Mail. The Ruskins have not heard from the rescued boater.

“I’m proud of Sam. He’s a strong swimmer. We’re in the ocean all the time. He did the right thing,” Ryan said.

The Jupiter Inlet is dangerous for swimmers and boaters. Recent incidents include:

Andrew “Red” Harris, 24, drowned while snorkeling in the Jupiter Inlet in June 2014.

* Edwin Castañon, 15, drowned while swimming at Dubois Park in 2015.

Austin Stephanos and Perry Cohen left the Jupiter Inlet in a 19-foot boat in July 2015. The two 14-year-old boys never returned.

Article source: http://www.wsbtv.com/news/trending-now/drone-video-captures-surfer13-rescuing-man-after-his-boat-capsizes/635311530

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Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off