Police find body at Jupiter Beach Park – wptv.com


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A body was found at the Jupiter Inlet on Saturday morning. Police are investigating the circumstances surrounding the death.




JUPITER, Fla. — Police are investigating the death of a person found at Jupiter Beach Park at the Jupiter Inlet.

Jupiter Police say they received a report about a person sleeping in the park. Upon investigation, officers learned the person was deceased.

This is a developing story. More information will be added as it becomes available.

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Article source: https://www.wptv.com/news/region-n-palm-beach-county/jupiter/police-find-body-at-jupiter-beach-park

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Jupiter restaurant partly owned by Michael Jordan opens in 3 weeks

Opening is planned in about three weeks for 1000 NORTH, the Jupiter waterfront restaurant partly owned by NBA star Michael Jordan.

Employees were practicing, movers were hauling in furniture and landscapers were planting in the parking lot on Thursday.


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1000 North will be a welcome addition to the restaurant community on the Jupiter waterfront said Chad Van Boven, the owner of Guanabanas, an outdoor eatery located just south of 1000 North.

“We have a casual, relaxed, flip-flops vibe. (1000 NORTH) sounds like it will be more formal. The more choices there are, the more people will come,” said Van Boven.

Jordan, who has a part-time home in the Bear’s Club off Donald Ross Road, is one of the founding partners of 1000 NORTH.

Others include local businessman Bjarne Borg, who owns the property; former New York Giants running back Tucker Frederickson; California winery owner Bill Terlato; Bears Club resident Raj Mantena; Jupiter resident Richard Rifkin; Palm Beach philanthropist Patrick Park; professional golfer Ernie Els; and Ira Fenton, a co-developer the Bears Club.

The restaurant on the Loxahatchee River is just north of Burt Reynolds Park on U.S. 1. Boating patrons can use the 326-foot-long public dock. Motorized boats can only dock on the outside of the eight-foot-wide dock for up to three hours, facing away from 1000 NORTH. No overnight docking is allowed, according to town records.

The dock was paid for by the developers of the restaurant.

The first floor of the 340-seat restaurant will be open to the public. There is an indoor and outdoor bar and restaurant seating.

The fee to join the private club on the second floor is $3,500 and the annual dues are $3,500. Private club membership will be limited to about 250.

The second floor will also have an outdoor patio for food and beverages. There will be occasional celebrity chefs.

Other restaurants in the area that have private memberships are located in Jonathan’s Landing, the Loxahatchee Club and Lost Tree Village.

Jordan joins Tiger Woods as the latest sports megastar with an eatery in Jupiter. The Woods, a restaurant in Harbourside Place, opened in the summer of 2015.

Indoor food and beverage sales at 1000 NORTH will be required to close at 2 a.m. Outdoor food and alcohol sales would end at midnight. Outdoor live music would require a special-event permit from the town.

Plans for 1000 NORTH — which measures 50 feet tall to the top of the tower — include a connection with Riverwalk, the town’s 2.4-mile pedestrian/bicycle waterfront lane from Ocean Way to the Jupiter Inlet that goes through Harbourside Place and along the Intracoastal Waterway and Jupiter Inlet.



Article source: http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/local/jupiter-restaurant-partly-owned-michael-jordan-opens-weeks/eP1jj9Mjawqjr5dpZ80XRN/

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Unique ‘taxi service’ at Jupiter’s Inlet Village takes off

Entertainer, concierge, parking attendant and promoter — Jeff Isaacs wears lots of hats as he steers his golf cart to ferry visitors to and from the attractions in Jupiter’s waterfront Inlet Village.

“I can find a good restaurant table with an ocean view,” he boasts. “Want to rent a kayak? I’ll sing happy birthday like Elvis. I have a blanket if it gets cold. Plus, I’m helping solve the parking problem,” says the lanky, fast-talking Jupiter resident as he ferries six jolly customers from the Square Grouper to their next stop at u-Tiki restaurant.

Called Zeke’s Golf Cart Taxi Service — named after Isaac’s father — he now has one golf cart. The ride is free and pets are allowed. Gratuities are optional, but once, he claims he got a $200 tip.


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The golf cart taxi is part of the town’s plan to reduce driving and encourage walking, bicycling and other modes of transportation in the Inlet Village, said Vice Mayor Wayne Posner.

The town installed speed bumps and reduced the speed limit and on A1A. About $8 million was spent adding sidewalks, bicycle lanes, lighting and landscaping on the roadway from Beach Road north to U.S. 1. New bicycle lanes, medians and sidewalks are planned for Indiantown Road from A1A west to U.S. 1.






“We’re rethinking the ways to alleviate traffic in the Inlet Village,” Posner said.

Isaacs, 57, is a private contractor whose profit comes from advertising banners on the golf cart, which can go up to 17 miles per hour.

Since May, the Atlanta native has been bringing customers along A1A from the parking lot at Jetty’s restaurant south to Juno Beach. Condominiums such as Ocean Trail, DuBois Park, Publix on Indiantown Road, the Juno Pier, the Pit Stop convenience store, Lighthouse Cove Mini-Golf and Harbourside Place are among his stops. So will be 1000 NORTH when it opens in three weeks.

“Why drive when you can have a free ride? I use this all the time. It’s safer and gets cars off the road,” said Jupiter resident Kayleigh Nolan, a waitress at 1000 NORTH who was celebrating her 21st birthday Thursday night with five pals riding the golf cart.

Isaacs just bought two more golf carts for about $12,000 each. Each seats up to eight people. He’s installing seat belts, tires, mirrors, brake lights and a windshield. He needs permits from Jupiter, Palm Beach County and Florida. Two drivers will be hired before he puts the new 17-foot-long vehicles on the road next month.

The town is considering a grant of between $5,000-$10,000 to Isaacs. He plans to move forward with or without the grant.

By the time he pays insurance, he figures it costs about $25,000 to put each one of the golf cart taxis on the road.

“If the Inlet Village is going to succeed, the town has to solve the parking problem,” said Isaacs, as he motors down Love Street.

Like a barnstorming politician, he waves and shouts out to pedestrians, drivers and valets. Many call his name and wave back.

“We call him Tall Jeff. Everybody knows him,” said Chad Van Boven, owner of Guanabanas.

Long-range plans call for buying more carts, said Isaacs, a former general contractor and landscaper who moved to Jupiter about 10 years ago.


READ: Approved and proposed waterfront developments in Jupiter

Delray Beach, Boca Raton and Palm Beach also have golf carts and electric vehicles that offer visitors free rides through their downtowns. Like the Jupiter service, profits come from advertising.

The Delray Beach Downtowner started six years ago next month. The 10 six-seater open-air vehicles drop off passengers up and down Atlantic Avenue between the tennis center and the Atlantic Ocean. About 200 riders a day ride the Delray Downtowner, said Ryan Spaargaren, one of the owners.

Developing a “grassroots relationship” with the local businesses is important to success, said Spaargaren. As hotels, restaurants and retail stores see more riders, they buy more advertising banners on the Downtowner vehicles.

Hiring drivers who are experts at the wheel and know the nooks and crannies of the the community is key to success, Spaargaren said.

“We are ambassadors to Delray Beach. When a passenger asks why the section of Atlantic Avenue is called Pineapple Grove, our drivers tell them about the pineapple groves that once were here,” Spaargaren said.

Chatting up local knowledge and businesses is part of the job, agreed Isaacs.

That’s one of the lessons he’ll pass on to the two new golf cart drivers who start next month. He’ll also tell them about the short cuts he’s found to local businesses and neighborhoods. And to wave to business owners and pedestrians. Smile.

And when you sing Happy Birthday for riders, pick your spot.

“I don’t want people to see us and go ‘Oh, no, there go those loud, crazy guys,’” Isaacs said.



Zeke’s Golf Cart Taxi Service

Wednesday through Friday, 5 p.m. – 1 a.m.

Saturday and Sunday, 1 p.m. – 1 a.m.

Article source: http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/local/unique-taxi-service-jupiter-inlet-village-takes-off/bqkRbHn0kRc6m2R61Yxd3J/

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UPDATE: Woman rescued from Atlantic near Jupiter’s Carlin Park

A woman was rescued from the Atlantic on Thursday morning off Carlin Park in Jupiter, Palm Beach County Fire Rescue said.

The park is just south of the Jupiter Inlet.

A person at the Jupiter Beach Resort Spa just north of the park described the woman as middle-aged. No further details were immediately available.

The National Weather Service in Miami warned Thursday morning of a moderate risk of rip currents along South Florida beaches. The currents are strong enough to pull swimmers out to deeper water.



Article source: https://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/local/update-woman-rescued-from-atlantic-near-jupiter-carlin-park/YidHvn9nQwsA7uiMmpFrGJ/

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JUST IN: Person pulled from Atlantic near Jupiter Beach Resort

A woman was rescued from the Atlantic on Thursday morning off Carlin Park in Jupiter, Palm Beach County Fire Rescue said.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/local/just-person-pulled-from-atlantic-near-jupiter-beach-resort/YidHvn9nQwsA7uiMmpFrGJ/

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Girls basketball: Jupiter rolls to 12th victory

Palm Beach Lakes 81, Dwyer 22: Keishmy Ayuso had 30 points, Rashara Simmons contributed 11 points and five steals, and Shaneicia Pinniy added 10 points and nine rebounds as the Rams (13-1) trounced the Panthers in West Palm Beach.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/sports/high-school/girls-basketball-jupiter-rolls-12th-victory/E3NDTVG2DwcuLK3o5ZkO7N/

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Study: Lake O not lone culprit for Treasure Coast algae problem

Lake Okeechobee is not the lone culprit in the recurring algae blooms that plague Treasure Coast waterways, but an accomplice aided by thousands of nitrogen-spewing septic tanks, according to a recently published Florida Atlantic University study.

A peer-reviewed FAU paper that appeared in December’s issue of the journal Harmful Algae, says that algae in freshwater lake discharges grows exponentially when it reaches the St. Lucie River because of heavy nitrogen levels specific to septic tanks.

The fresh lake water weakens the brackish water ecosystem then the algae feeds on the reactive forms of nitrogen, such as ammonium and nitrate, that come from the tanks, according to the report.

Brian LaPointe, lead author of the study and a research professor at FAU’s Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, said the study was able to trace the nitrogen’s source not to fertilizer — long blamed for the growth — but to human sources.

“This is compelling evidence that the problem we are seeing with the algae blooms, even though they can originate in the lake and be carried into the estuary, is exacerbated by elevated nitrogen that is locally sourced from septic tanks,” LaPointe said. “Not to say there aren’t fertilizers there, but our work shows the wastewater signal is a major contributor supporting the bloom.”

Sucralose, an artificial sweetener, that was found in water samples was a key clue in identifying septic tanks as a contributing factor. Sucralose is not broken down by the body, and “not used by cattle.”

LaPointe presented the research, which he said was paid for by the Martin County Utilities Department, at the National Harmful Algae Bloom conference in November.

“Everyone wants to blame this on the farms and there is a lot of denial about the wastewater problem,” LaPointe said. “People overlook the role of population growth on the Indian River Lagoon, and a lot of that growth has relied on septic tanks.”

A 2015 study by LaPointe found there are more than 300,000 septic tanks in a five-county area between the Jupiter Inlet and the Ponce Inlet in Volusia County. But LaPointe said Monday it could be closer to 600,000 because decades-old septic tanks may not be recorded in county records.

“It’s too many people, and too much poop,” said Bill Louda, an FAU research professor who studies phosphorus and nitrogen amounts in Florida’s waterways. “Once the bloom is in the lake and it makes it into the estuaries it gets more nutrients from the septic tanks and that perpetuates it and lets it grow to tremendous proportions.”

LaPointe’s study of water quality in the St. Lucie Estuary has been ongoing, but the septic tank component was criticized and dismissed by environmentalists in 2016 when a widespread algae bloom grew in the estuary after the Army Corps of Engineers began releasing Lake Okeechobee water to lessen pressure on the aging Herbert Hoover Dike.

The blame for the bloom was put squarely on Lake Okeechobee discharges, triggering legislation that fast-tracked the building of a new reservoir south of the lake to hold overflow instead of sending it east to the St. Lucie and west to the Caloosahatchee Estuary.

Gov. Rick Scott, who declared a state of emergency in 2016 in response to the algae outbreak, also proposed $60 million in last year’s state budget to help homeowners switch from septic tanks to sewer systems in response to the algae bloom. The money was not approved by lawmakers, but $50 million is being sought in the current budget request.

“It has long been thought that the algal blooms found in Lake Okeechobee, which are caused by pollution such as runoffs from farms, were solely responsible for driving the blooms and their toxins in the St. Lucie Estuary,” LaPointe said.

Treasure Coast environmentalists are skeptical of LaPointe’s findings, arguing the amount of nitrogen from septic tanks is minuscule compared to what’s coming from agriculture.

“It isn’t all about septic tanks,” said Mark Perry, executive director of the Florida Oceanographic Society in Stuart. “I don’t want to discount that they could be a problem if they are located in a bad area, but let’s not lose focus on the big problem and that is Lake Okeechobee discharges and agricultural runoff.”

But LaPointe argues it’s flawed to look at total nitrogen output because it’s only specific forms called “reactive nitrogen” that feed algae growth.

“The harmful blooms aren’t just in the St. Lucie Estuary, we are seeing problems up and down the Indian River Lagoon,” he said.



Article source: http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/weather/study-lake-not-lone-culprit-for-treasure-coast-algae-problem/AazfK0a36attOZo4nNKsNP/

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Lake Okeechobee not lone cause of Treasure Coast algae …

Lake Okeechobee is not the lone culprit in the recurring algae blooms that plague Treasure Coast waterways, but an accomplice aided by thousands of nitrogen-spewing septic tanks, according to a recently published FAU study.

A peer-reviewed Florida Atlantic University paper that appeared in December’s issue of the journal Harmful Algae, says that algae in freshwater lake discharges grows exponentially when it reaches the St. Lucie Estuary because of heavy nitrogen levels in the waterway.

First, the fresh lake water weakens the ecosystem, which is accustomed to more brackish water, then the algae feeds on the reactive forms of nitrogen, such as ammonium and nitrate, that come from septic tanks, according to the report.

The algae bloom from Lake Okeechobee has grown since it was first measured in May. This algae bloom is in the St. Lucie Estuary on Friday, July 8, 2016. (Joseph Forzano / The Palm Beach Post)

Brian LaPointe, lead author of the study and a research professor at FAU’s Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, said the study was able to trace the nitrogen’s source not to fertilizer – long blamed for the growth – but to human sources.

Related: Algae on Lake O, could we see a repeat of 2016?

“This is compelling evidence that the problem we are seeing with the algae blooms, even though they can originate in the lake and be carried into the estuary, is exacerbated by elevated nitrogen that is locally sourced from septic tanks,” LaPointe said. “Not to say there aren’t fertilizers there, but our work shows the wastewater signal is a major contributor supporting the bloom.”

LaPointe presented the research at the National Harmful Algae Bloom conference in November.

“Everyone wants to blame this on the farms and there is a lot of denial about the wastewater problem,” LaPointe said. “People overlook the role of population growth on the Indian River Lagoon, and a lot of that growth has relied on septic tanks.”

Algae flows out of Lake Okeechobee on Friday, July 8. Photo by Palm Beach Post photographer Joe Forzano

A 2015 study by LaPointe found there are more than 300,000 septic tanks in a five-county area between the Jupiter Inlet and the Ponce Inlet in Volusia County. But LaPointe said Monday it could be closer to 600,000 because decades-old septic tanks may not be recorded in county records.

RELATED: Can Lake Okeechobee algae outbreaks be forecast? NOAA thinks so

“The harmful blooms aren’t just in the St. Lucie Estuary, we are seeing problems up and down the Indian River Lagoon,” he said.

LaPointe’s research came under fire during the summer of 2016 when a widespread algae bloom grew in the St. Lucie Estuary after the Army Corps of Engineers began releasing Lake Okeechobee water to lessen pressure on the aging Herbert Hoover Dike.

“It isn’t all about septic tanks,” said Mark Perry, executive director of the Florida Oceanographic Society in Stuart. “I don’t want to discount that they could be a problem if they are located in a bad area, but lets not lose focus on the big problem and that is Lake Okeechobee discharges and agricultural runoff.”

FAU released information about the journal publication this morning, the same day a report is due to state lawmakers on building an up to $2 billion reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee to alleviate flows to the estuaries and end algae outbreaks.

LIVE RADAR MAP: Check The Palm Beach Post radar map

LaPointe said he didn’t know the report was due Monday.

The reservoir is part of legislation pushed last year by Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart. Negron’s original proposal was for 60,000 acres of land south of the lake, including on property owned by U.S. Sugar, be used for the reservoir.

That was reduced to about 34,000 acres of state-owned land in western Palm Beach County.

LaPointe said the reservoir may reduce releases to the estuaries, but he’s concerned about the water that will be sent out of it into the Everglades.

He said water treatment areas that use plants to remove nutrients from the water work well on phosphorous, not nitrogen.

“When we move water south into Florida Bay that is carrying nitrogen, it’s not good,” he said.

Bill Louda, a Florida Atlantic University research professor who studies phosphor us and nitrogen amounts in Florida’s waterways, vouched for LaPointe’s findings.

“It’s too many people, and too much poop,” Louda said. “But it’s not just septic tanks. It’s lawn fertilizers, agriculture and everything.”

If you haven’t yet, join Kim on Facebook Instagram and Twitter .






Article source: http://weatherplus.blog.mypalmbeachpost.com/2018/01/09/lake-okeechobee-not-lone-cause-of-treasure-coast-algae/

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Family Values

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JUPITER, FL – January 5, 2018 – The rich history of our scenic town is partly made up of the people whose roots run deep here and have witnessed as well as participated in its growth. Evelyne Bates, whose numerous contributions to many trades in the Jupiter area are well-documented, certainly falls under this category. Throughout a career that spans over five decades, Evelyne was a Jupiter Tequesta Athletic Association secretary, a historian of the Lighthouse Art Center, an organizer of the Tequesta Fest, and one of the first docent tour guides of the Jupiter Lighthouse—she still climbs up to the top to this day to give tours! She recounts that throughout her time here, she has seen Jupiter’s population go from 500 to over 64,000. As the matriarch of a family that continues to leave daily footprints, she is proud of its history of individual contributions, which date back to the mid-1950s.

Evelyne’s grandfather, Freddie Dahlmeyer, was actually the first chief of Tequesta, and her uncle, Lou Loliberti, was the first chief of the Jupiter Inlet Colony. Evelyn’s husband, Wally Bates, was one of the first thee city carriers of the Jupiter-Tequesta area, and her grandson, Jack Bates, is one of the most acclaimed photographers in our area today. Evelyne, along with 22 members of the Bates family, all currently reside in the Jupiter area and continue to augment their roots through various community endeavors.

The Bates family—(Top, Left to Right): George Dzama, Airca Nuquist Dzama, Tom Johnston, Megan Johnston, Todd Johnston, Debbie Bates Johnston, Jack Bates Senior, Dianna Bates Nuquist, Ryan Nuquist, Dylan Nuquist, Lily Bates, Kristen Colson Nuquist, Austin Nuquist; (Bottom, Left to Right): Jay Dzama, Wally Bates, George Dzama V, Ryland Nuquist, Aubré Dzama, Evelyne Bates, Gina Martin Bates, Adley Nuquist, Jack Bates

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Article source: http://www.injupiter.com/jupiter-florida-stories/family-values/321

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LATEST: Nine detained after boat lands in Jupiter; trafficking probed

Eight of the passengers were foreign nationals from as far away as China and Turkey, said a spokesman for Homeland Security. They were taken into custody as part of a criminal investigation, along with one American who was aboard, and remain in custody at U.S. Border Control’s station in Riviera Beach.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime--law/latest-nine-detained-after-boat-lands-jupiter-trafficking-probed/NH3zG9S5sSRxaiazNOlsjK/

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