UPDATE: ‘No-swim’ advisory ends for Jupiter park

The elevated bacterial levels are generally associated with wildlife, heavy recreational usage, high surf from high winds and high tides, or runoff following heavy rainfall.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime--law/update-swim-advisory-ends-for-jupiter-park/MOOd5GW8ZBCfHhEUQ8Ay3K/

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Icky brown waters off Palm Beach County concern tourism leaders

The topaz-blue waters off Palm Beach County have had more noticeably brown days this fall – an opaque sea of tea that is less inviting and even dangerous as high bacteria levels have forced a handful of temporary no-swimming orders.

Officials from the South Florida Water Management District and county agree the icky looking stew is the result of storm water runoff from record rainfall and canal discharges necessary to keep communities from flooding.

But beachgoers are dismayed and tourism leaders are concerned, so much so that the Palm Beach County’s Tourist Development Council agreed last week to send a letter to Gov. Rick Scott and legislative leaders about the water.

Related: Why a record number of beaches closed this week.

A surfer rides through the barrel of a wave next to the Jupiter Inlet, September 20, 2017. Hurricane Jose kicked up swells 5 to 7 feet. (Greg Lovett / The Palm Beach Post)

County Mayor Paulette Burdick, who is chairwoman of the council, said she wants it known that water concerns aren’t just a Treasure Coast issue. Lawmakers were focused during the 2017session on finding a solution to the algae that clogs the St. Lucie estuary and can show up on Martin County beaches when too much Lake Okeechobee water is released.

Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

“Instead of letting water sit on the land and filter and percolate, we put it in our canals and send it out into the Lake Worth Lagoon,” Burdick said. “It’s not just important to have clean, affordable water, but this has an economic impact to tourism.”

While snowbirds are slowly making their way to South Florida for the winter, and Thanksgiving will draw a crowd, tourism picks up in December with high season being February and March.

Brian Gentry, environmental program supervisor for Palm Beach County Environmental Resource Management, hopes the water clears as South Florida enters deeper into the dry season.

Jessica Wakefield donned her T. Rex suit to kayak behind a truck driven by fellow Jupiter Farms residents James Wilkinson and Fred Virostko through standing water on 159th Court North off Jupiter Farms Road Friday morning, October 6, 2017. Why, one might ask. “Why not?”, said Wakefield, adding she had the day off and “I couldnt resist the opportunity for a laugh.” (Lannis Waters/The Palm Beach Post)

“We had one of the wettest years on record and they have to get rid of that water,” Gentry said. “This too shall pass.”

Related: Philippe dumps double-digit rainfall in Palm Beach County. 

According to the water management district, the six-month period ending Oct. 20 was the second wettest on record for the 16-county region that includes Palm Beach County. Records date to 1932.

Between June 2 and Nov. 1 – roughly the rainy season – 51.64 inches of rain fell from the Kissimmee basin above Lake Okeechobee to Key Largo. That’s 150 percent more than normal, or 17.25 inches more than average for that time period. .

All that water has to go somewhere, and that’s usually draining into canals that send it to the Intracoastal and ocean.

Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

“It’s definitely a result of all the flood control,” said Randy Smith, spokesman for the South Florida Water Management District. “This water comes in from the local drainage districts, the counties, anyone who has a connection with water management system is dumping their water into the big regional canals.”

Smith said the water discharged in Palm Beach County is not coming from Lake Okeechobee, which is sending overflow through the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers. Lake Okeechobee stood at 16.68 feet above sea level Monday. That’s above the high-water mark of 15.5 feet the Army Corps of Engineers prefers.

The National Weather Service said South Florida’s dry season officially began Oct. 24.

But then Tropical Storm Philippe surprised Palm Beach County with a deluge that dumped as much as 10 inches of rain in isolated areas. A couple of stalled cold fronts and east winds kept the county wet over the weekend.

Tropical Storm Philippe slogged through Palm Beach County Oct. 28, 2017. Radar image courtesy @bmcnoldy

“This is a unique situation,” Smith said. “The sheer volume of rainfall has been immense.”

Also, September’s Hurricane Irma cut down vegetation, some of which ended decomposing in canals. That decomposition adds to the brown color of the water.

“I’m seeing a polluted coastline from Jupiter to I don’t know how far south,” said Jack Corrick, a Singer Island resident. “Visitors are starting to come back and if people won’t go in the water, it would be a quick death for us.”

But brown doesn’t always equal polluted. The Florida Health Department in Palm Beach County tests 13 beaches for high bacteria levels and will close them to swimming if the tests come back high.

That happened earlier this month when seven beaches were closed to swimming from Jupiter to Boca Raton. It was the most beaches closed at a single time since the water testing program began 17 years ago.

If you haven’t yet, join Kim on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

 






Article source: http://weatherplus.blog.mypalmbeachpost.com/2017/11/14/icky-brown-waters-off-palm-beach-county-concern-tourism-leaders/

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UPDATE: ‘No-swim’ advisory ends at Boynton-area park, remains in Jupiter

A similar advisory for Dubois Park in Jupiter, however, remains in effect, since bacteria levels in the water remain high.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/update-swim-advisory-ends-boynton-area-park-remains-jupiter/9YVVc5wrrajGOegpa18D8O/

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Palm Beach County’s brown water a concern for beach goers, touris

The topaz-blue waters off Palm Beach County have been noticeably more brown this fall — an opaque sea of tea that is less inviting and even dangerous as high bacteria levels have forced a handful of temporary no-swimming orders.

Officials from the South Florida Water Management District and county agree the icky looking stew is the result of storm water runoff from record rainfall and canal discharges necessary to keep communities from flooding.

But beachgoers are dismayed and tourism leaders are concerned, so much so that the Palm Beach County’s Tourist Development Council agreed last week to send a letter to Gov. Rick Scott and legislative leaders about the discolored water.


RELATED: Why a record number of beaches closed this week

County Mayor Paulette Burdick, who is chairwoman of the council, said she wants it known that water concerns aren’t just a Treasure Coast issue. Lawmakers were focused during the 2017 session on finding a solution to alleviate the algae that clogs the St. Lucie Estuary and can show up on Martin County beaches when too much Lake Okeechobee water is released.

“Instead of letting water sit on the land and filter and percolate, we put it in our canals and send it out into the Lake Worth Lagoon,” Burdick said. “It’s not just important to have clean, affordable water, but this has an economic impact to tourism.”

On Tuesday, the Florida Health Department in Palm Beach County issued advisories for high bacteria levels at Ocean Inlet Park in Ocean Ridge and Dubois Park in Jupiter. That followed a record number of advisories earlier this month when seven beaches were closed to swimming from Jupiter to Boca Raton. It was the most beaches closed at a single time since the health department’s water testing program began 17 years ago.


LIVE RADAR: Check The Palm Beach Post radar map

While snowbirds are slowly making their way to South Florida for the winter, and Thanksgiving will draw a crowd, tourism picks up in December with high season being February and March.

Brian Gentry, environmental program supervisor for Palm Beach County Environmental Resource Management, hopes the water clears as South Florida enters deeper into the dry season.

“We had one of the wettest years on record and they have to get rid of that water,” Gentry said. “This too shall pass.”


RELATED: Philippe dumps double-digit rainfall in Palm Beach County

According to the water management district, the six-month period ending Oct. 20 was the second wettest on record for the 16-county region that includes Palm Beach County. Records date to 1932.

Between June 2 and Nov. 1 — roughly the rainy season — 51.64 inches of rain fell from the Kissimmee basin above Lake Okeechobee to Key Largo. That’s 150 percent more than normal, or 17.25 inches more than average for that time period.

All that water has to go somewhere, and that’s usually draining into canals that send it to the Intracoastal and ocean.

“It’s definitely a result of all the flood control,” said Randy Smith, spokesman for the South Florida Water Management District, about the brown beach water. “This water comes in from the local drainage districts, the counties, anyone who has a connection with water management system is dumping their water into the big regional canals.”


WILL IT RAIN? Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here

Smith said the water discharged in Palm Beach County is not coming from Lake Okeechobee, which is sending overflow through the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers. Lake Okeechobee stood at 16.62 feet above sea level Thursday. That’s above the high-water mark of 15.5 feet the Army Corps of Engineers prefers.

The National Weather Service said South Florida’s dry season officially began Oct. 24.

But then Tropical Storm Philippe surprised Palm Beach County with a deluge that dumped as much as 10 inches of rain in isolated areas. A couple of stalled cold fronts and east winds kept the county wet over last weekend.

“This is a unique situation,” Smith said. “The sheer volume of rainfall has been immense.”

Also, September’s Hurricane Irma cut down vegetation, some of which ended up decomposing in canals. That decomposition adds to the brown color of the water.

“I’m seeing a polluted coastline from Jupiter to I don’t know how far south,” said Jack Corrick, a Singer Island resident. “Visitors are starting to come back and if people won’t go in the water, it would be a quick death for us.”

But brown doesn’t always equal polluted. The Florida Health Department in Palm Beach County tests 13 beaches for high bacteria levels and will close them to swimming if the tests come back high.

If you haven’t yet, join Kim on

Facebook

,

Instagram

and

Twitter

.



Article source: http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/weather/hurricanes/why-palm-beach-county-beach-water-has-been-brown/3EW38miMXnB9leT4paSX7J/

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Why Palm Beach County’s beach water has been so brown

The topaz-blue waters off Palm Beach County have been noticeably more brown this fall — an opaque sea of tea that is less inviting and even dangerous as high bacteria levels have forced a handful of temporary no-swimming orders.

Officials from the South Florida Water Management District and county agree the icky looking stew is the result of storm water runoff from record rainfall and canal discharges necessary to keep communities from flooding.

But beachgoers are dismayed and tourism leaders are concerned, so much so that the Palm Beach County’s Tourist Development Council agreed last week to send a letter to Gov. Rick Scott and legislative leaders about the discolored water.


RELATED: Why a record number of beaches closed this week

County Mayor Paulette Burdick, who is chairwoman of the council, said she wants it known that water concerns aren’t just a Treasure Coast issue. Lawmakers were focused during the 2017 session on finding a solution to alleviate the algae that clogs the St. Lucie Estuary and can show up on Martin County beaches when too much Lake Okeechobee water is released.

“Instead of letting water sit on the land and filter and percolate, we put it in our canals and send it out into the Lake Worth Lagoon,” Burdick said. “It’s not just important to have clean, affordable water, but this has an economic impact to tourism.”

On Tuesday, the Florida Health Department in Palm Beach County issued advisories for high bacteria levels at Ocean Inlet Park in Ocean Ridge and Dubois Park in Jupiter. That followed a record number of advisories earlier this month when seven beaches were closed to swimming from Jupiter to Boca Raton. It was the most beaches closed at a single time since the health department’s water testing program began 17 years ago.


LIVE RADAR: Check The Palm Beach Post radar map

While snowbirds are slowly making their way to South Florida for the winter, and Thanksgiving will draw a crowd, tourism picks up in December with high season being February and March.

Brian Gentry, environmental program supervisor for Palm Beach County Environmental Resource Management, hopes the water clears as South Florida enters deeper into the dry season.

“We had one of the wettest years on record and they have to get rid of that water,” Gentry said. “This too shall pass.”


RELATED: Philippe dumps double-digit rainfall in Palm Beach County

According to the water management district, the six-month period ending Oct. 20 was the second wettest on record for the 16-county region that includes Palm Beach County. Records date to 1932.

Between June 2 and Nov. 1 — roughly the rainy season — 51.64 inches of rain fell from the Kissimmee basin above Lake Okeechobee to Key Largo. That’s 150 percent more than normal, or 17.25 inches more than average for that time period.

All that water has to go somewhere, and that’s usually draining into canals that send it to the Intracoastal and ocean.

“It’s definitely a result of all the flood control,” said Randy Smith, spokesman for the South Florida Water Management District, about the brown beach water. “This water comes in from the local drainage districts, the counties, anyone who has a connection with water management system is dumping their water into the big regional canals.”


WILL IT RAIN? Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here

Smith said the water discharged in Palm Beach County is not coming from Lake Okeechobee, which is sending overflow through the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers. Lake Okeechobee stood at 16.62 feet above sea level Thursday. That’s above the high-water mark of 15.5 feet the Army Corps of Engineers prefers.

The National Weather Service said South Florida’s dry season officially began Oct. 24.

But then Tropical Storm Philippe surprised Palm Beach County with a deluge that dumped as much as 10 inches of rain in isolated areas. A couple of stalled cold fronts and east winds kept the county wet over last weekend.

“This is a unique situation,” Smith said. “The sheer volume of rainfall has been immense.”

Also, September’s Hurricane Irma cut down vegetation, some of which ended up decomposing in canals. That decomposition adds to the brown color of the water.

“I’m seeing a polluted coastline from Jupiter to I don’t know how far south,” said Jack Corrick, a Singer Island resident. “Visitors are starting to come back and if people won’t go in the water, it would be a quick death for us.”

But brown doesn’t always equal polluted. The Florida Health Department in Palm Beach County tests 13 beaches for high bacteria levels and will close them to swimming if the tests come back high.

If you haven’t yet, join Kim on

Facebook

,

Instagram

and

Twitter

.


Article source: http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/weather/hurricanes/why-palm-beach-county-beach-water-has-been-brown/3EW38miMXnB9leT4paSX7J/

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BREAKING: ‘No-swim’ advisories issued for Jupiter, Ocean Ridge parks

The elevated bacterial levels are generally associated with wildlife, heavy recreational usage, high surf from high winds and high tides, or runoff following heavy rainfall.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/local/breaking-swim-advisories-issued-for-jupiter-ocean-ridge-parks/0075ChpF7wuHMRegCtXkIN/

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Icky brown waters off Palm Beach County concern tourism leaders

The topaz-blue waters off Palm Beach County have had more noticeably brown days this fall – an opaque sea of tea that is less
inviting and even dangerous as high bacteria levels have forced a handful of temporary no-swimming orders.

Officials from the South Florida Water Management District and county agree the icky looking stew is the result of storm water
runoff from record rainfall and canal discharges necessary to keep communities from flooding.

But beachgoers are dismayed and tourism leaders are concerned, so much so that the Palm Beach County’s Tourist Development
Council agreed last week to send a letter to Gov. Rick Scott and legislative leaders about the water.


Related: Why a record number of beaches closed this week.


A surfer rides through the barrel of a wave next to the Jupiter Inlet, September 20, 2017. Hurricane Jose kicked up swells
5 to 7 feet. (Greg Lovett / The Palm Beach Post)


A surfer rides through the barrel of a wave next to the Jupiter Inlet, September 20, 2017. Hurricane Jose kicked up swells
5 to 7 feet. (Greg Lovett / The Palm Beach Post)

County Mayor Paulette Burdick, who is chairwoman of the council, said she wants it known that water concerns aren’t just a
Treasure Coast issue. Lawmakers were focused during the 2017session on finding a solution to the algae that clogs the St.
Lucie estuary and can show up on Martin County beaches when too much Lake Okeechobee water is released.


Download the Palm Beach Post WeatherPlus app here.

“Instead of letting water sit on the land and filter and percolate, we put it in our canals and send it out into the Lake
Worth Lagoon,” Burdick said. “It’s not just important to have clean, affordable water, but this has an economic impact to
tourism.”

While snowbirds are slowly making their way to South Florida for the winter, and Thanksgiving will draw a crowd, tourism picks
up in December with high season being February and March.

Brian Gentry, environmental program supervisor for Palm Beach County Environmental Resource Management, hopes the water clears
as South Florida enters deeper into the dry season.


Jessica Wakefield donned her T. Rex suit to kayak behind a truck driven by fellow Jupiter Farms residents James Wilkinson
and Fred Virostko through standing water on 159th Court North off Jupiter Farms Road Friday morning, October 6, 2017. Why,
one might ask. “Why not?”, said Wakefield, adding she had the day off and “I couldnt resist the opportunity for a laugh.”
(Lannis Waters/The Palm Beach Post)


Jessica Wakefield donned her T. Rex suit to kayak behind a truck driven by fellow Jupiter Farms residents James Wilkinson
and Fred Virostko through standing water on 159th Court North off Jupiter Farms Road Friday morning, October 6, 2017. Why,
one might ask. “Why not?”, said Wakefield, adding she had the day off and “I couldnt resist the opportunity for a laugh.”
(Lannis Waters/The Palm Beach Post)

“We had one of the wettest years on record and they have to get rid of that water,” Gentry said. “This too shall pass.”


Related: Philippe dumps double-digit rainfall in Palm Beach County. 

According to the water management district, the six-month period ending Oct. 20 was the second wettest on record for the 16-county
region that includes Palm Beach County. Records date to 1932.

Between June 2 and Nov. 1 – roughly the rainy season – 51.64 inches of rain fell from the Kissimmee basin above Lake Okeechobee
to Key Largo. That’s 150 percent more than normal, or 17.25 inches more than average for that time period. .

All that water has to go somewhere, and that’s usually draining into canals that send it to the Intracoastal and ocean.


Check The Palm Beach Post radar map.

“It’s definitely a result of all the flood control,” said Randy Smith, spokesman for the South Florida Water Management District.
“This water comes in from the local drainage districts, the counties, anyone who has a connection with water management system
is dumping their water into the big regional canals.”

Smith said the water discharged in Palm Beach County is not coming from Lake Okeechobee, which is sending overflow through
the St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee rivers. Lake Okeechobee stood at 16.68 feet above sea level Monday. That’s above the high-water
mark of 15.5 feet the Army Corps of Engineers prefers.

The National Weather Service said South Florida’s dry season officially began Oct. 24.

But then Tropical Storm Philippe surprised Palm Beach County with a deluge that dumped as much as 10 inches of rain in isolated
areas. A couple of stalled cold fronts and east winds kept the county wet over the weekend.


Tropical Storm Philippe slogged through Palm Beach County Oct. 28, 2017. Radar image courtesy @bmcnoldy


Tropical Storm Philippe slogged through Palm Beach County Oct. 28, 2017. Radar image courtesy @bmcnoldy

“This is a unique situation,” Smith said. “The sheer volume of rainfall has been immense.”

Also, September’s Hurricane Irma cut down vegetation, some of which ended decomposing in canals. That decomposition adds to
the brown color of the water.

“I’m seeing a polluted coastline from Jupiter to I don’t know how far south,” said Jack Corrick, a Singer Island resident.
“Visitors are starting to come back and if people won’t go in the water, it would be a quick death for us.”

But brown doesn’t always equal polluted. The Florida Health Department in Palm Beach County tests 13 beaches for high bacteria
levels and will close them to swimming if the tests come back high.

That happened earlier this month when seven beaches were closed to swimming from Jupiter to Boca Raton. It was the most beaches
closed at a single time since the water testing program began 17 years ago.


If you haven’t yet, join Kim on



Facebook



,



Instagram



and



Twitter



.

 

Article source: http://www.palmbeachdailynews.com/weather/hurricanes/icky-brown-waters-off-palm-beach-county-concern-tourism-leaders/JmclNJ0qKwStGJfroCie5M/

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Final two: Thursday is decision day to choose new Jupiter town manager

After starting with about 60 applicants from around the nation, the Jupiter town council is scheduled to select a new town manager on Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at the Community Center.

The two finalists are:

- Matt Benoit, city manager, Huntsville, Texas.

- David Buckingham, city manager, Morro Bay, Calif.


JUPITER READERS: Sign up for the weekly Jupiter newsletter

Many Jupiter residents may be wondering, what does a town manager do?


According to the ad placed by Keller, Texas-based Strategic Government Resources to find candidates, the manager “prepares a recommended budget, recruits, hires, and manages the municipal government staff and advises the council.”


SEE: Original list of Jupiter Town Manager candidates

In Jupiter’s case, that would mean the new manager would be in charge of a $90 million annual budget with about 380 employees. The manager makes the final decision on firing town employees, including police officers.

SGR was a big cheerleader for Jupiter in the ad the company placed for the job. The chamber of commerce couldn’t have done any better:

“Pristine beaches, unmatched recreational offerings, stunning scenic vistas, a high quality of life, and access to world-class amenities are just a few of the reasons roughly 60,000 people are proud to call Jupiter home. The Town of Jupiter has come a long way from its early days as a pioneer village for fishermen and animal trappers during the turn of the 20th century,” read the ad.

The ad also noted the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, Florida Atlantic University, beaches, Roger Dean Stadium, Harbourside Place, Riverbend Park, Scripps Research Institute and the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse, “The red brick lighthouse (that) stands 105 feet in the sky.”

SGR was paid $18,500 to find applicants. Additional expenses are not to exceed $8,500, according to the agreement with the town.

Former Town Manager Andy Lukasik, 47, who was paid about $180,000 annually, left March 18 to be village manager in North Palm Beach. Lukasik was in the Jupiter position since 2004.

The new manager can expect some immediate challenges, such as:

- Whether to spend up to $36 million for a new town hall/police complex, reducing traffic on Indiantown Road and how to handle waterfront development.


READ: Pricey condos planned near Harbourside Place

- Determining what construction method to use for the new $120 million U.S. 1 bridge over the Loxahatchee River, just north of the Burt Reynolds bridge. Arguments are brewing on what is a better idea: Keep the bridge open to traffic and finish the job in about four years, or close the bridge for about a year and finish the job in about three years. Business people, locals, boaters and residents all are expected to register their ideas.

About 21,000 motorized vehicles daily go over the draw bridge, built in 1958. The new bridge is expected to last 75 years, according to county records. Construction is planned to start in July 2021.

- How to handle increasing traffic in Indiantown Road. Plans are under consideration to spend $2 million to add sidewalks and bicycle lanes to Indiantown Road east of U.S. 1.

- What to do with the two acres of vacant Daniels Way property next to the Jupiter Community Center recently bought by the town for $3 million.

Preliminary plans call for building a roundabout on the parcel on Indiantown Road at Daniels Way. Using the land for recreation and municipal services is another consideration.

- Development of two large parcels on Indiantown Road.

  • A 58-acre parcel straddling Island Way in Jupiter that was bought last summer by Crossroads 6101 LLC. The land, just east of I-95 and north of Indiantown Road, was owned by DDR Jupiter Falls, an affiliate of Beachwood, Ohio-based DDR Corp. (NYSE: DDR). Hotels, restaurants, warehouses, clinical research, day care and light manufacturing are among the uses allowed under the current zoning.
  • The Hawkeye property on 82 acres is just south of Indiantown Road and east of I-95. Preliminary plans call for 1 million square feet of corporate/high tech office space.


Article source: http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/local/final-two-thursday-decision-day-choose-new-jupiter-town-manager/5AF0YyXND4cD6eV8qnfCHJ/

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Upscale pontoon boats getting popular in Jupiter

“Pontoons fit more passengers than regular boats. They are affordable for more people. They are more comfortable. They have more shade. They sip gas,” said Bret Beach, owner of Beach Water Sports, a company that rents the vessels along the Intracoastal Waterway just north of the Palm Beach County line.



Once thought of as floating lawn chairs, pontoon boats are growing in versatility and popularity. Some have bars. Mini-kitchens. Bathrooms. Televisions. They pull water-skiers.

“The type of boats is constantly shifting. It depends on the price of gas. What type of fishing is popular. How well the economy is doing,” said Chuck Collins, executive director of the Marine Industries Association of Palm Beach County.

A decade or so ago, pontoon boats were the ugly duckling of the boating industry.

No more, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association.

Pontoon boats led the recreational marine industry out of the Great Recession and the worst boating sales slump in decades. Sales have been growing steadily. Pontoons now represent about one-third of sales of new boats, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association.

American builders sold a total of 49,829 pontoon boats during the 2016 calendar year. That’s almost a 10 percent increase over the number of pontoon boats sold during 2015. And in 2015, there was an increase of about nine percent from the previous year, according to the NMMA.

Why?

Price is one reason.

A new 26-foot pontoon boat costs about $25,000. A new single-engine outboard 26-foot motor boat with a center console the same length would start at about three times that much.

“Pontoon boats are introducing younger people to boating. Pontoon boats are very popular with families. They like to go to a sandbar or freshwater lake and totally relax,” said Collins.

Comfort is another reason.

Pontoons are easier to get in and out of from a dock. There’s more room for coolers and other boat stuff. There’s more seating for passengers than a v-shaped boat the same size.

Usually about 22-28 feet long, they rely on two inflatable aluminum pontoons to float. Much of the flat surface is covered by a canopy. They usually have engines that can go about 25 miles per hour.

Then there are boats with three pontoons. They are called — what else? — tritoons. The engines are a little larger. They are more stable than twin pontoons.

The tradeoff is tritoons are not as maneuverable as twin pontoon boats. They require larger trailers. And larger docks.

And there are big pontoon boats, like the 50-foot Manatee Queen that brings up to about 45 passengers for sightseeing tours on the Intracoastal Waterway off Jupiter.

Then there are party pontoons, such as the Pontiki, docked on the Jupiter River just south of Guanabanas restaurant. Advertised as a “floating tiki bar,” the 28-foot pontoon boat has a refrigerator, wet bar, grill, television and stereo. Beer and wine are available. Up to six passengers pay $30 each per hour.

“My most popular events are bachelorette parties,” said co-owner Tom D’aLessandro.

Docking his 26-foot pontoon boat at the public boat ramp at Harbourside Place on a recent afternoon, Jimmy Haywood said price was the main reason he bought his twin pontoon boat.

Haywood, 36, a traffic engineer from Port Salerno, fits up to a dozen people comfortably. They can bring fishing rods, towels, snorkels, fins, coolers and other stuff.

More stability means less people get seasick. He uses way less gas than his pals with V-shaped boats, he said.

“I’m less worried about the little ones falling overboard,” he said, tapping the thigh-high side rails that surround the inside of the craft.

There are disadvantages.

Pontoons don’t go as fast as motorboats. Their turn radius is not as tight. In other words, they don’t handle as well.

They are not safe on rough waters. They are not recommended to be taken out into the Jupiter Inlet or the Atlantic Ocean. That means no dolphin fishing or offshore hunting for lobster.

But fishing is popular on pontoon boats in the Intracoastal Waterway and inland lakes, not only in Florida but other states from Minnesota to Maine. Many pontoon boats come equipped with fishing rod holders, fish-finder mounts, small anchors and other fishing gear.

Many say fishing on a pontoon boat is more productive.

A pontoon boat is stable so it doesn’t spook fish as does a rocking V-hulled boat. And the flat surface gives fishermen more room to move around.

Pontoon boat drafts may be as shallow as eight inches, far less than a motor boat. That reduces risk of running aground and potential hull damage while fishing or stopping at a sand bar.

“Pontoon boats are great for a family or group going out for a few hours on the Intracoastal Waterway or on a lake. I’ve been renting boats for 30 years. I see more pontoons now than ever,” said Beach.

Pontoon boats are a Minnesota invention

Ambrose Weeres in 1951 wanted to make a sturdy pleasure craft more stable than a conventional fishing boat in Richmond, Minn., in Stearns County in the state of 10,000 lakes.

Weeres set a wooden platform on top of two rows of watertight steel barrels. He welded the barrels together end to end. Weeres tested his first boat on Horseshoe Lake in Stearns County.

It floated. His craft was steady.

Weeres took 40 orders in 1952 for his boats. He displayed the boat at a show in Chicago. In the years to come, tens of thousands of Weeres pontoons would be made in Minnesota and sold throughout the nation.

SOURCE: Stearns County Historical Museum

___

Information from: The Palm Beach (Fla.) Post, http://www.pbpost.com

Article source: http://www.sfchronicle.com/news/article/Upscale-pontoon-boats-getting-popular-in-Jupiter-12350922.php

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Nick Price, Mike Davis and a new path for the USGA

Nick Price had been friends with Mike Davis for a while, the two, joined by their wives, having shared dinners together on occasion at the waterfront restaurants along the Jupiter Inlet. The Hall of Fame player and the executive director of the USGA were connected through their memberships at Seminole Golf Club, but it was while breaking bread that Davis got to thinking about Price joining the USGA’s Executive Committee.

During their meals Price would pick Davis’ brain about technological advancements in equipment, site selection of USGA championship venues, philosophy on course setups and best-practices in agronomy. It turns out their minds worked the same ways.

“At one of those dinners he said, ‘Mike, I would like to somehow help you guys in any way I can,’ ” Davis told me. “ ‘I’m getting to the point where I’m not going to be playing competitive golf that much longer. I just want to give back to the game.’ That give back to the game resonated.”

Price’s interest and passion resonated with members of the the USGA Nominating Committee, who added him to their 2018 slate for the 15-person board that will be voted on at the USGA Annual Meeting next February. Iconic amateur golfers Francis Ouimet, Bobby Jones and Fred Ridley, the new Augusta National chairman, have previously sat on the committee, but never a tour professional of Price’s caliber. That’s why Price rates this honor ahead of winning the USGA’s Bob Jones Award and the PGA Tour’s Payne Stewart Awards for service to the game.

“This is new ground,” Price told me. “I’m just humbled they chose me. There are 100 other guys they could have asked to do it, so it’s very humbling. This is a major step forward for the USGA. I’m excited to be a part of it, I really am. For decades, for as long as I can remember, there was an attitude that it was our way or the highway. These should be interesting times ahead.”

RELATED: In nod to tour pros, USGA nominates one of their own for Executive Committee

What could provide the most interest is not Price being the link between amateur and professional golf, or his assistance in setting up U.S. Open venues to avoid controversies and the potential criticism from tour players. Some of the USGA’s patriarchs like Joe Dey, P.J. Boatwright and Frank Hannigan might have been uncomfortable with this dynamic, but it shows that in the wake of various recent rules controversies that the USGA is willing to admit it doesn’t always have the right answers on everything.

“It’s good for us to have relationships with players, whether it’s a recreational golfer, an amateur golfer, junior amateur golfers, senior golfers or men’s and women’s tour golfers. I think definitely it improves our relationships with the tours,” Davis says, while admitting, “It’s gotten away from us some, and our role is to get better at that. At the end of it, if we do well, it’s good for the game of golf, and as a tour player, you want to see golf excel. So I can’t imagine Nick won’t be a tremendous asset in terms of relationships with the players. He grew up being a player, and that’s how he sees it, from that perspective. It’s just different playing on the tour, that’s your mindset, so it will be a welcome addition.”

U.S. Open - Preview Day 3
Streeter Lecka

Davis hopes having a respected former player like Price will help tour pros believe their perspectives are being heard.

I asked Davis if we would be seeing Price walking Shinnecock Hills before sunset next June, checking hole locations and tee markers at the U.S. Open? “I hope so. Absolutely,” was his immediate response.

I also asked Davis that with Price in the room, would this lead to a serious examination of where the professional game is going in terms of distance. Davis’ answer was not as straightforward, but he wasn’t discounting it, either. He pointed out that neither has Martin Slumbers, the chief executive of the RA.

“As we look to the future, the thing I’ve always said is we’re mindful of the past and you have to be respectful of the past. But things over the last 600 years have changed, and they’ve innovated themselves.”

Davis pointed out that it was the same when Ben Hogan was playing, and players like Gene Sarazen and Jones were lamenting going from hickory to steel shafts.

“The concept of courses continually having to expand [due to] equipment is the wrong thing,” Davis continued. “It needs to be the opposite. Equipment has to fit courses. There is no other sport that changes its playing arena to fit equipment.” He used the Green Monster at Fenway Park as an example, and how the Red Sox would have to move the wall back 100 feet if aluminum bats were legalized.

“But that’s exactly what’s happened in golf,” Davis said. “You learn from the past, but for us, it’s looking forward.”

Of course Davis is coming off a U.S. Open venue at Erin Hills that could have been stretched to 7,800 yards and was annihilated by Brooks Koepka, who shot 16 under to win by four strokes, and Justin Thomas, who shot nine-under 63 in the third round, the lowest score in relation to par in U.S. Open history. But he seems more concerned about sustainability and the cost of water going up four-fold between now and 2030. It’s those issues at the recreational level that might just be more pressing.

Price is on the same page as Davis on all of this in terms of having concerns about the future. Not long after we spoke, Tiger Woods used his platform to say on a podcast what Jack Nicklaus has been saying for decades, “Something has to be done about the golf ball.”

RELATED: How Nick Price is changing the way we think about the Presidents Cup

It’s more than coincidental that in the 2002 U.S. Open won by Woods (averaging 296 yards off the tee) at Bethpage Black, that Price was one of the loudest voices complaining the 7,214-yard par 70—then the longest in U.S. Open history, was going to be unplayable to some of the average length players, in particular three par 4s that played 500-plus yards. “If they keep doing this, they’ll take the fun out of the game because only a few guys can win,” Price said at the time. “But maybe that’s what the USGA wants.”

Fifteen years later, maybe that’s not what the USGA wants immediately. Asked point blank if part of his mission was going after the ball, Price said that was a “TBD.”

“I have my thoughts, and I know what I think, but I don’t know what they think,” Price said. “I’m looking forward to working with the tech guys, and I have spent a little time with them. All I’m saying, this is an opportunity for us as professional golfers to do something with the USGA that’s unique.”

Does unique mean bifurcation of the rules between the pros and the everyday game or, simply as Woods said, rolling the ball back? Either way, having a well-respected Hall of Famer helping deliver the message will make it an easier sell.

But it’s not all about the ball. That’s just the hot-button topic right now. If there’s a bad green at Shinnecock, or a rules violation like what happened to Dustin Johnson in 2016 at Oakmont, it can’t hurt to have Price in the loop with the USGA.

“Is there anybody in the world of golf,” wonder Davis, “who doesn’t think the world of Nick Price?”

The question seems rhetorical. But if not, the answer honestly seems to be no.


Chris Condon/Getty Images

Price felt that with his playing career winding down, and his stint as Presidents Cup captain over, he still had more to give back to the game.


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Article source: https://www.golfdigest.com/story/the-rosaforte-report-nick-price-mike-davis-and-a-new-path-for-the-usga

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