Killer: Shark diving in state worth $200 million a year – TCPalm.com

There is just something special about sharks.

Up close, a shark commands immediate respect — the kind of respect reserved for things that can eat you if they want to. It doesn’t mean they will. Usually, they won’t. In fact, they almost never do.

For some, seeing a shark in an aquarium is enough. For others, it’s fun to catch one on rod and reel, either from a boat or a beach, and then release it.

But for thousands of scuba divers, free divers and snorkelers, the best way to experience a shark is to interact with it in its natural habitat, the ocean.

Shark Addicts helps shark fans realize their dreams.

Within 20 minutes of leaving the dock, Shark Addicts can have up to six divers off the coast of Jupiter Inlet and in the warm waters of the Gulf Stream eyeballing bull sharks, tiger sharks, lemon sharks and hammerhead sharks within arm’s length.

Three Jupiter locals have grown Shark Addicts from a passion into a part-time business. Chris Cameron, Cameron Nimmo and Mickey Smith bring divers face to face with sharks off the “Jupiter Ledge.”

Cameron said the bloody, oily scent of cut bonito and fish heads in Nimmo’s “bait crate” calls up sharks in five minutes or less.

“Where we live, we can have as many as seven species of sharks show up,” Cameron said. “Our divers will stay there in the water until people can’t swim anymore. We’ll be in the water with the sharks for over three hours.”

Cameron said Shark Addicts provides a profound message of conservation for its clients.

“Sharks are not bloodthirsty man-eaters,” Cameron said. “They are opportunistic apex hunters. Shark diving has become really popular in recent years. Social media has had a huge role in its growth. People see footage all over the place of shark encounters. These animals are not caged up; they are not in a zoo.

“It’s one reason why this has just exploded.”

Cameron said diving with sharks has become a “bucket list” item for many. Like sky diving, bungee jumping and even climbing Mount Everest, diving with a shark gets the adrenaline pumping.

Cameron gets calls from all over the world.

Nimmo and Smith began filming their dives with sharks in 2013 while out with Randy Jordan of Emerald Dive Charters in Jupiter. Now, with more than 300,000 followers across various social media platforms, Cameron said they’re “as busy as we want to be.”

And the numbers support his claim.

Oceana, an international advocacy organization focused on ocean conservation, released a report this week extolling the economic value of sharks as a draw for ecotourism businesses. According to Oceana’s research, shark diving in Florida is now a $221 million-a-year industry supporting more than 3,700 jobs and generating more than $377 million in indirect economic impact. Shark diving is perhaps the fastest growing market segment of the diving economy in Florida.

Kind of a twist on the plot of “Jaws,” isn’t it? Instead of shutting down the beaches during the tourist season, it turns out having sharks near a beach community is filling seats on airplanes, filling beds in hotel rooms and driving sales of dive equipment and underwater camera gear. Even coastal fishing charter businesses are reaping benefits from having a healthy shark population.

The report was released to generate support for the Shark Fin Sales Elimination Act, federal legislation banning the buying and selling of shark fins in the United States. In comparison to shark dive dollars generated, Oceana’s report claims shark fin sales are only around $1 million a year.

Shark finning is the practice of catching a shark, slicing off its fins and discarding the injured and now immobile shark to die a slow death as it drowns and bleeds to death. It has been banned in U.S. waters since 2000.

Asian markets buy shark fins for sale in shark fin soup. Each year, Oceana reports, fins from 73 million sharks hit the world market. Many of the species observed bought and sold at markets in Hong Kong are at high risk of extinction.

Florida laws protect 27 species of sharks from harvest. The state also enforces a ban on dive charter operators from feeding sharks during dives in state waters. As a result, Shark Addicts and their peers, more than 370 of them, must carry their shark watchers into federal waters, more than three miles from shore on the Atlantic Coast and nine miles on the Gulf Coast.

“It seems inconsistent to me that the state allows the practice of taking a chunk of bonito off the beach and allowing someone to catch a huge hammerhead or bull shark from the beach on rod and reel with bait, but a dive charter can’t feed sharks within three miles from shore,” Cameron said.

He’s got a point. And he bristles at the thought of a federal rule, if any ever comes along, doing the same thing.

Until then, Cameron’s message for potential shark divers is clear. Once one gets past the hype and the horror perpetuated by film and scary headlines, the shark is really just a gentle creature living in a world of wonder.

And it’s worth much more alive and well than it is in someone’s soup.

Shark Addicts

Learn more: Go to shark-addicts.com or follow Shark Addicts on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Shark Diving Dollars

Florida shark diving direct revenue: $221 million

Florida total economic impact from shark encounters: $377 million

Jobs supported: 3,700

U.S. shark fin exports: $1.03 million

Source: Oceana

Ed Killer is the outdoors columnist for Treasure Coast Newspapers, TCPalm.com and the USA Today Network, and this column reflects his opinion. Friend him on Facebook at Ed Killer, follow him on Twitter @tcpalmekiller, email him at ed.killer@tcpalm.com or call him at 772-221-4201.

Article source: http://www.tcpalm.com/story/sports/columnists/ed-killer/2017/03/25/killer-shark-diving-state-worth-200-million-year/99598876/

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Killer: Shark diving in state worth $200 million a year

There is just something special about sharks.

Up close, a shark commands immediate respect — the kind of respect reserved for things that can eat you if they want to. It doesn’t mean they will. Usually, they won’t. In fact, almost never.

For some, seeing a shark in an aquarium is enough. For others, it’s fun to catch one on rod and reel, either from a boat or a beach, and then release it.

But for thousands of scuba divers, free divers and snorkelers, the best way to experience a shark is to interact with it in its natural habitat, the ocean.

Shark Addicts helps shark fans realize their dreams.

Within 20 minutes of leaving the dock, Shark Addicts can have up to six divers off the coast of Jupiter Inlet and in the warm waters of the Gulf Stream eyeballing bull sharks, tiger sharks, lemon sharks and hammerhead sharks within arm’s length.

Three Jupiter locals have grown Shark Addicts from a passion into a part-time business. Chris Cameron, Cameron Nimmo and Mickey Smith bring divers face to face with sharks off the “Jupiter Ledge.”

Cameron said the bloody, oily scent of cut bonito and fish heads in Nimmo’s “bait crate” calls up sharks in five minutes or less.

“Where we live we can have as many as seven species of sharks show up,” said Cameron. “Our divers will stay there in the water until people can’t swim anymore. We’ll be in the water with the sharks for over three hours.”

Cameron said Shark Addicts provides a profound message of conservation for its clients.

“Sharks are not bloodthirsty man-eaters,” Cameron said. “They are opportunistic apex hunters. Shark diving has become really popular in recent years. Social media has had a huge role in its growth. People see footage all over the place of shark encounters. These animals are not caged up, they are not in a zoo.

“It’s one reason why this has just exploded.”

Cameron said diving with sharks has become a “bucket list” item for many. Like sky diving, bungee jumping and even climbing Mount Everest, diving with a shark gets the adrenaline pumping.

Cameron gets calls from all over the world.

Nimmo and Smith began filming their dives with sharks in 2013 while out with Randy Jordan of Emerald Dive Charters in Jupiter. Now, with more than 300,000 followers across all social media platforms, Cameron said they’re “as busy as we want to be.”

And the numbers support his claim.

Oceana, an international advocacy organization focused on ocean conservation, released a report this week extolling the economic value of sharks as a draw for ecotourism businesses. According to Oceana’s research, shark diving in Florida is now a $221 million a year industry supporting more than 3,700 jobs and generating over $377 million in indirect economic impact. Shark diving is perhaps the fastest growing market segment of the diving economy in Florida.

Kind of a twist on the plot of Jaws, isn’t it? Instead of shutting down the beaches during the tourist season, it turns out having sharks near a beach community is filling seats on airplanes, filling beds in hotel rooms and driving sales of dive equipment and underwater camera gear. Even coastal fishing charter businesses are reaping benefits from having a healthy shark population.

The report was released to generate support for the Shark Fin Sales Elimination Act, federal legislation banning the buying and selling of shark fins in the United States. In comparison to shark dive dollars generated, Oceana’s report claims shark fin sales are only around $1 million a year.

Shark finning is the practice of catching a shark, slicing off its fins and discarding the injured and now immobile shark to die a slow death as it drowns and bleeds to death. It has been banned in U.S. waters since 2000.

Asian markets buy shark fins for sale in shark fin soup. Each year, Oceana reports, fins from 73 million sharks hit the world market. Many of the species observed bought and sold at markets in Hong Kong are at high risk of extinction.

Florida laws protect 27 species of sharks from harvest. The state also enforces a ban on dive charter operators from feeding sharks during dives in state waters. As a result, Shark Addicts and their peers, more than 370 of them, must carry their shark watchers into federal waters, more than three miles from shore on the Atlantic Coast and nine miles on the Gulf Coast.

“It seems inconsistent to me that the state allows the practice of taking a chunk of bonito off the beach and allowing someone to catch a huge hammerhead or bull shark from the beach on rod and reel with bait, but a dive charter can’t feed sharks within three miles from shore,” Cameron said.

He’s got a point. And he bristles at the thought of a federal rule, if any ever comes along, doing the same thing.

Until then, Cameron’s message for potential shark divers is clear. Once one gets past the hype and the horror perpetuated by film and scary headlines, the shark is really just a gentle creature living in a world of wonder.

And it’s worth much more alive and well than it is in someone’s soup.

Shark Addicts

Learn more: Go to http://shark-addicts.com or follow Shark Addicts on YouTube, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

Shark Diving Dollars

Florida shark diving direct revenue: $221 million

Florida total economic impact from shark encounters: $377 million

Jobs supported: 3,700

U.S. shark fin exports: $1.03 million

Source: Oceana

Ed Killer is the outdoors columnist for Treasure Coast Newspapers, TCPalm.com and the USA Today Network, and this column reflects his opinion. Friend him on Facebook at Ed Killer, follow him on Twitter @tcpalmekiller, email him at ed.killer@tcpalm.com or call him at 772-221-4201.

Article source: http://www.tcpalm.com/story/sports/columnists/ed-killer/2017/03/25/killer-shark-diving-state-worth-200-million-year/99598876/

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Jupiter murder mystery: 7 key questions about the triple-homicide

Questions, theories and just plain guesses are swirling about what happened at 1105 Mohawk Street on Feb. 5, the night three people in their 20s were slain there.

Christopher Vasata faces three counts of first-degree murder as well as charges for other felonies in the shooting deaths of Kelli J. Doherty, 20, of Tequesta, Brandi El-Salhy, 24, of Gainesville and Sean P. Henry, 26, of Jupiter. Charles Vorpagel, 27, who rented the house, was arrested Feb. 9 on a federal firearms charge.

The probable-cause affidavit says “three or four people appeared and began shooting.”

Through interviews and reviews of documents, The Post has learned that law enforcement narrowly missed apprehending at least one other suspect, besides Vasata, on the night of the murders.

With suspects still on the loose — and Jupiter police remain tight-lipped about the case — the investigation remains an edgy topic, Mayor Todd Wodraska said.

“Every public meeting I go to, that’s the first thing people talk about. This happened in the heart of old Jupiter. This has really shaken residents’ confidence,” said Wodraska, a lifelong town resident.


Among the many puzzle pieces, here are seven key ones:

1. Who shot Christopher Vasata?

Vasata was shot twice in the lower back and buttocks, apparently at the murder scene. A Palm Beach County sheriff’s deputy saw Vasata getting out of the back seat of a dark-colored, four-door sedan on the 100 block of Paseos Way and collapsing on the street.

The injuries required surgery, and Vasata was hospitalized for more than six weeks at St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach before he was arrested Monday at the hospital.


Read the probable-cause affidavit for Christopher Vasata’s arrest

Vasata’s police report gives no indication of who shot him. Speculation immediately following the murders was that Vorpagel may have exchanged gunfire with the assailants. Among the weapons federal investigators said Vorpagel kept in the home were high-powered, semi-automatic rifles.

But the arrest report states that Vorpagel ran away as soon as the shooting broke out. He jumped over a fence then tried to get a neighbor’s assistance before hiding as the killers fled the house.

Vorpagel was taken to Jupiter Medical Center suffering from shock, indicating that he might have been too shaken to engage in a shootout.

A more likely explanation is that Vasata was shot accidentally by one of the masked men who accompanied him to Vorpagel’s home. All of the shell casings found at the murder scene, according to the arrest report, belonged to a pair of guns found by police and likely belonging to the suspects.

2. How did the gunmen reach 1105 Mohawk Street?

The “three or four” masked gunmen that Vorpagel told police committed the shooting likely arrived at the home by car. Whether they arrived and left in one or more vehicles has not been determined. Did the gunmen arrive and leave in separate vehicles, going in different directions?

Cars are not the only way the gunmen could have reached the home, which sits on a narrow canal. A theory proposed by residents — not police — is that the gunmen arrived by boat and left either in one or separate vehicles.

Many homes along the canal — 20-30 feet wide and lined with mangroves — on the north side of Mohawk Street have docks. The canal has access to the Loxahatchee River, the Burt Reynolds Park boat ramp, the Jupiter Inlet and the Atlantic Ocean. There is also kayak access at the southwest corner of Indiantown Road and Melaleuca Lane at the Jones Creek Preserve, northeast of Mohawk.

But navigating the canal would require an experienced boater, especially at night.

When officers questioned him at St. Mary’s Medical Center, Vasata said he walked the half-mile to Vorpagel’s house from the house on South Delaware Boulevard in which he was living. Vorpagel told police Vasata was “not there as an invited guest” at the Mohawk Street house.

3. Was Sean Henry’s Honda a getaway car?

Sean Henry’s Honda Accord was stolen from the driveway of the Mohawk Street house that night. The car was found 8:30 the next morning one mile north of Northlake Boulevard on the south side of Interstate 95. That’s 11 miles south of the site of the slayings.

Police discovered blood stains in the front and back seats. Two firearms – at least one of which matched the shell casings from the back yard — and the keys to a black 2004 BMW linked to Vasata were found in a nearby culvert. A blood-stained pillow was found in the vehicle.

So was a single black glove, police said.


Read the search warrant for the house at 1105 Mohawk St.

Vorpagel told investigators he saw a car pull out of his driveway as he hid from the gunmen that night. He later realized Henry’s car was missing.

Jupiter police said they cannot confirm the dark sedan deputies saw Vasata get out of was Henry’s Honda. Several questions arise if they are the same car. Did the gunmen find Henry’s keys during the shooting or did they hotwire the Honda? If they used his keys, where did they find them? Did one of the gunmen know Henry?

4. How close did authorities come to catching Vasata’s accomplice(s)?

At 10:40 p.m., about six minutes after Jupiter Police received the first 911 calls, a Palm Beach County sheriff’s deputy spotted a dark-colored, four-door sedan being driven erratically about one mile from the crime scene.

The deputy attempted a traffic stop, but the driver fled.

Following Sheriff’s Office policy, the deputy did not launch a high-speed pursuit because there was no evidence the driver had committed anything more serious than a traffic violation.

The deputy got close enough to the sedan on the 100 block of Paseos Way to see Vasata get out the rear driver’s side door of the vehicle then collapse in the middle of the street, according to the arrest report. The sedan driver then fled.

The deputy stopped on Paseos Way to help the injured Vasata. It wasn’t until he realized that Vasata had been shot that the deputy learned he was involved in something bigger than a motorist running a stop sign or driving recklessly.

A second deputy attempted to track down the sedan, but it was lost from view while traveling west on Indiantown Road toward Interstate 95.

5. What was Chris Vasata’s story?

According to the police report, Vasata said before he went into surgery for his wounds that he had been shot by unknown people at “a buddy’s house,” and that he was outside the house when he was shot. He did not identity the “buddy.”

Vasata said he was pulled into a vehicle after he was shot and dropped off where officers found him. He did not specify by who.

Much of Vasata’s story remains curious. A black 2004 BMW was found parked next to the spot on Paseos Way where Vasata was found. The BMW had been leased to Vasata several months before the shooting, police said. There is nothing in the police report indicating Vasata lived on Paseos Way.

A loaded magazine for a .40-caliber Glock handgun and a single stray “Perfecta” were found in Vasata’s shorts, police said.

So was a single black glove – just like at Henry’s Honda.

6. What was the motive?

In criminal law, motive must be established before guilt can be determined. So what caused masked gunmen, allegedly including Vasata, to storm the home at 1105 Mohawk St. and execute three possibly innocent victims?

Robbery doesn’t appear to be a likely.

The details of a search warrant served at the home revealed that six guns — including two high-powered semi-automatic rifles — and a stash of drugs ranging from cocaine to hash oil were found at the home after the murders.

All the victims were wearing jewelry when their bodies were found, according to the search warrant. Investigators also seized several items, including a wallet and $128 cash that belonged to Henry, El-Salhy’s wallet and keys and Doherty’s purse. An iPad and cellphones were also recovered.

Retribution appears a more likely motive, considering that two of the principles in the case have criminal drug histories.

Vorpagel, whose father rented the home, admitted to investigators he sold drugs from the house and that he worked with another person to buy and sell firearms.

Vasata has a history of drug arrests. He served more than a year in prison after being convicted in January 2014 of buying $36,000 worth of marijuana he intended to sell.

7. Up to three killers are still on the loose. Is Jupiter safe?

Jupiter Police Chief Frank Kitzerow has met with groups of residents of Jupiter River Estates, the larger neighborhood that contains Mohawk Street, since the Feb. 5 shooting.

“I told them Jupiter is a safe community. We are working diligently on the case. I told them the work is meticulous. It takes time build a case. We are following every lead,” said Kitzerow.

Kitzerow declined to answer specific questions, saying the investigation isn’t finished.

Tom Peterson, a three-year resident of Jupiter River Estates, said residents are concerned that three or four masked gunmen may still be on the loose.

“We were happy to hear about the arrest (of Vasata). We’re a little nervous about those shooters still being out there,” said Peterson.

Peterson still takes his regular walks with his two dogs. He sits outside his home near Jupiter River Estates Park. He feels safe, he said.

“I understand why Jupiter police are tight-lipped about the investigation. We all want them to get to the bottom of this,” said Peterson.

“People feel relief there has been an arrest. Now, let’s arrest the other ones still out there,” said Wodraska, a lifelong resident of Jupiter.

Jennifer Foster, a 13-year resident of Jupiter River Estates, said life is slowly getting back to normal in the neighborhood east of Maplewood Drive between Indiantown Road and Toney Penna Drive, near Jupiter Christian School.

“I still get jolted when I hear fireworks go off at night. People like to shoot them off around here. But I feel safe. I’m happy for the families that there has been an arrest,” Foster said.


Article source: http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/crime--law/jupiter-murder-mystery-key-questions-about-the-triple-homicide/02G2rz0GznAJE172QnY8XJ/

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Miami Dolphins Foundation makes donation to Perry Cohen Jupiter High School project

JUPITER, Fla. —

The Miami Dolphins Foundation has pledged 25-Thousand dollars to the Perry J. Cohen Wetlands Laboratory at Jupiter Community High School.

Download WPBF 25 News App: Apple IOS | Android

As you may recall- Back in 2015 Perry Cohen and his friend Austin Stephanos went on a fishing trip out of the Jupiter inlet and never returned.

The donation will help transform an existing storm-water retention pond at the front of the school into a wetlands habitat and outdoor classroom.

Article source: http://www.wpbf.com/article/miami-dolphins-foundation-makes-donation-to-perry-cohen-jupiter-high-school-project/9165396

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NEW: Jupiter girl, 14, slain 27 years ago; killer still at large

“At the sheriff’s office, we don’t give up,” Detective William Springer, a cold-case investigator for PBSO on the Hurley case, said at a news conference Friday. “We’re not going to give up.”

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime--law/new-jupiter-girl-slain-years-ago-killer-still-large/lrOIR7WaVLgHBefumZK64H/

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Miami Dolphins Foundation makes donation to Perry Cohen Jupiter …

JUPITER, Fla. —

The Miami Dolphins Foundation has pledged 25-Thousand dollars to the Perry J. Cohen Wetlands Laboratory at Jupiter Community High School.

Download WPBF 25 News App: Apple IOS | Android

As you may recall- Back in 2015 Perry Cohen and his friend Austin Stephanos went on a fishing trip out of the Jupiter inlet and never returned.

The donation will help transform an existing storm-water retention pond at the front of the school into a wetlands habitat and outdoor classroom.

Article source: http://www.wpbf.com/article/miami-dolphins-foundation-makes-donation-to-perry-cohen-jupiter-high-school-project/9165396

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Art Fest by the Sea welcomes patrons to ‘paradise’


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The 29th Annual Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center Art Fest by the Sea was described as an art experience in paradise.

Art enthusiasts of all ages enjoyed beautiful sunny days by the ocean, while they perused artwork by more than 300 artists from all over the nation.

Held March 11 and 12 along State Road A1A in Juno Beach, this nearly three-decade-old festival was a hit among visitors and artists alike.

Art from all over the U.S.

From sculptures to paintings, wearable art and furniture, Art Fest by the Sea had it all.

More than 300 artists displayed their work, and among them many who traveled from outside of Florida.

Vincent Pernicano, a painter and jewelry maker from Michigan, said he has been coming back to this festival for six years to show his work because of the response he receives from those attending.

“The people here are so appreciative,” Pernicano said. He also returns to this show for the location.

“This is the best city I’ve ever done a show in.”

‘One of the best places’

Many of the artists at Art Fest by the Sea shared Pernicano’s sentiments.

Evan Reinheimer, a photographer from Long Island, New York, said Juno Beach is “one of the best places for an art show because the people here appreciate art.”

Nick and Marilyn Fortney, from Hudson, said they love the show because of the quality of the art.

“I want to buy everything!” Marilyn Fortne said.

Steven Anderson, a sculptor from Michigan who works with copper and stainless steel, said he thinks the festival is so successful because of the promoter, Howard Alan of Howard Alan Events.

“He actually promotes the show, and he promotes it well,” Anderson said.

Quality art, location 

Noting that visitors come from all over just to attend the incredible festival, Debby Milboer, a festival volunteer, raved about the location.

“Friends ask me why I come to Juno (for the festival), and I tell them … because it’s paradise!”

Devoted patron Nona Bilionis has attended the festival for the past 15 years. What brings her back all these years? The art, the artists and the fun, was her answer.

“It’s fun! A lot of the artists return every year and we get to know them.”

There was one major aspect of Art Fest by the Sea that the artists and attendees held in common — that it was held right across the highway from the Atlantic Ocean.

Promoting local art

Another great offering of the festival, besides its art and location was that it promoted local art and environmental efforts. Loggerhead Marinelife Center, located near the festival in Juno Beach, operated a booth to share information, as did Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum, representing its facility located alongside Jupiter Inlet in Jupiter.

Convenient and visitor-friendly

A free trolley was available for use during the festival, as local parking lots were full. Trolleys brought people to an off-site parking lot at Florida Power Light Co., located about a 10-minute drive away.

The trolley, which was provided by Molly’s Trolleys, conveniently dropped visitors off at both ends of the event, so that they didn’t have to walk farther than necessary. Pamphlets were distributed to attendees with the names and booth numbers of the artists on-site, for those looking for specific types of art or a particular artist.

For more information, visit online at http://www.artfestival.com/cities/juno-beach.

Article source: http://www.tcpalm.com/story/specialty-publications/jupiter-courier/2017/03/23/art-fest-sea-welcomes-patrons-paradise/99203310/

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We’re Giving Away 4 Tickets To The Wild & Scenic Film Festival At …

We’re Giving Away 4 Tickets To The Wild Scenic Film Festival At Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse

Want to catch environmental flicks on a giant outdoor screen along Jupiter’s waterfront? 

Well, we’re giving away tickets to the third annual Wild and Scenic Film Festival, set to take place April 8 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in front of Jupiter’s Lighthouse.

The screening will feature 16 short films that showcase how can be more connected to the Earth, as well as live music and a DJ, opportunities to purchase snacks and drinks, and a raffle. The good news is two pairs of tickets are up for grabs, valued at $10 a piece.

To enter, fill out the form below. The winners will be selected on Friday, March 31, at 1 p.m ET. and will then be asked to pick up their tickets at will call.

Be sure to bring a lawn chair! Good luck.

Article source: https://www.jupitermag.com/were-giving-away-4-tickets-wild-scenic-film-festival-jupiter-inlet-lighthouse

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We’re Giving Away 4 Tickets To The Wild & Scenic Film Festival At Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse

We’re Giving Away 4 Tickets To The Wild Scenic Film Festival At Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse

Want to catch environmental flicks on a giant outdoor screen along Jupiter’s waterfront? 

Well, we’re giving away tickets to the third annual Wild and Scenic Film Festival, set to take place April 8 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in front of Jupiter’s Lighthouse.

The screening will feature 16 short films that showcase how can be more connected to the Earth, as well as live music and a DJ, opportunities to purchase snacks and drinks, and a raffle. The good news is two pairs of tickets are up for grabs, valued at $10 a piece.

To enter, fill out the form below. The winners will be selected on Friday, March 31, at 1 p.m ET. and will then be asked to pick up their tickets at will call.

Be sure to bring a lawn chair! Good luck.

Article source: https://www.jupitermag.com/were-giving-away-4-tickets-wild-scenic-film-festival-jupiter-inlet-lighthouse

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A hit last year, outdoor movie night at Jupiter Lighthouse returns

“People from all walks of life share their experiences, feelings and accomplishments in and around their oceans, lands, and communities in these mesmerizing films,” said Kathleen Glover, JILM Assistant Director and Wild and Scenic Film Festival-Jupiter Coordinator.

Article source: http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/local/hit-last-year-outdoor-movie-night-jupiter-lighthouse-returns/IhKBheGZX7Hwl57yTqygyO/

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